pithiness


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pith·y

 (pĭth′ē)
adj. pith·i·er, pith·i·est
1. Precisely meaningful; forceful and brief: a pithy comment.
2. Consisting of or resembling pith.

pith′i·ly adv.
pith′i·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pithiness - terseness and economy in writing and speaking achieved by expressing a great deal in just a few words
terseness - a neatly short and concise expressive style
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

pithiness

[ˈpɪθɪnɪs] N (= terseness) → lo sucinto, concisión f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

pithiness

n (fig)Prägnanz f, → Markigkeit f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
The text brims with similes, precise word choices, and imaginative juxtapositions, and its chapter titles encapsulate the eloquent and varied matter-of-factness of its descriptions, including "February: Wet (Mud Month)," "April: Salamander Dancing," and "November: Roots" and echoing the pithiness and beautiful brevity of their content.
But from time to time, our esteemed judges take an opportunity to remind us of the law's great written tradition, whether by powerful rhetoric, meticulous reasoning, devastating pithiness, or simple humor.
These represent his career star and explain accuracy and pithiness. It also demonstrates discipline.
In addition to simplifying otherwise-complex narratives, representative anecdotes have the benefit of pithiness in a 24-hour news environment.
Is his New York Times obituary for the great intellectual Irving Howe, Richard Bernstein reports that when a woman once criticized Howe for titling his history of immigrant Jewish culture merely World of Our Fathers, the author replied that "World of Our Fathers is a title; World of Our Fathers and Our Mothers is a speech." However apt Howe's pithiness was, it has been the project of American Jewish cultural history over the past four decades to fill in the blank spaces in his topography of Jewish life, particularly with respect to the changing gender roles and sexual attitudes of twentieth-century Jews as they increasingly have interacted, clashed, and come to influence the wider perception and practice of these values in American popular culture.
Its tasting notes says its "aroma hints at tart pithiness and the flavour is zesty and bitter from the use of Galaxy hops, followed by a lovely long, dry bitter finish.
In its characteristic pithiness, The Economist's Baobab blog describes one such encounter with traffic police in Freetown, Sierra Leone:
"his wittiness in devising, his pithiness in uttering, his complaints of love so lovely, his discourses of pleasure so pleasantly, his pastoral rudeness, his moral wiseness, his due observing of decorum everywhere, in personages, in seasons, in matter, in speech, and generally in all seemly simplicity of handling his matter and framing his words" (102).
I raise these distinctions at the outset because Smith's otherwise admirable work of revisionism employs the terms 'anti-Semitic' and 'Semitic' and their cognates in ways that tacitly validate the Victorian racial constructs she seeks to expose as fantasies: the pithiness of Smith's repeated expression contrasting 'semantic' with 'Semitic' (189, 219), as well as her consistent use of 'anti-Semitic' (189, 192, 195, 201, 202, 205, 207, 209, 219), undercut her argument for deessentialization.
While the expression may sound careless, Ruskin writes, in fact "its very audacity and pithiness are intended to make us look close [sic| at the phrase and remember it" (18:72), for it is an image of the two great Church offices--Bishop (one who sees) and Pastor (one who feeds)--corrupted, their proper functions reversed and replaced by blindness and greedy hunger.
This is a superbly creative way of telling us about cattle-stealing: the lines spoken by Evan have a swagger and a pithiness which memorably encapsulates the whole problem.
Not much room for pithiness but it is a great title.