pittance

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pit·tance

 (pĭt′ns)
n.
1. A meager monetary allowance, wage, or remuneration.
2. A very small amount: not a pittance of remorse.

[Middle English pitance, from Old French, allowance of food to a monk or poor person, from Medieval Latin pietantia, from *pietāns, *pietant-, present participle of *pietāre, to show compassion, from Latin pietās, piety; see pity.]

pittance

(ˈpɪtəns)
n
a small amount or portion, esp a meagre allowance of money
[C16: from Old French pietance ration, ultimately from Latin pietās duty]

pit•tance

(ˈpɪt ns)

n.
1. a small amount or share.
2. a small allowance of money.
3. a scanty wage or remuneration.
[1175–1225; Middle English pitaunce < Old French pitance, variant of pietance piety, pity, allowance of food]

Pittance

 a small portion; a small number or amount.
Examples: pittance of food; of grace, 1561; of instruction, 1841; of learning; of money; of reason and truth, 1561; of wages, 1749.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pittance - an inadequate payment; "they work all day for a mere pittance"
payment - a sum of money paid or a claim discharged

pittance

noun peanuts (slang), trifle, modicum, drop, mite, chicken feed (slang), slave wages, small allowance Her secretaries work tirelessly for a pittance.
Translations

pittance

[ˈpɪtəns] Nmiseria f
she gets paid a pittancele pagan una miseria

pittance

[ˈpɪtəns] nbouchée f de pain (fig)
He is paid a mere pittance → On ne le paye qu'une bouchée de pain.

pittance

nHungerlohn m

pittance

[ˈpɪtns] nmiseria, somma miserabile
References in classic literature ?
She then betook herself to the business of packing, for which a small quantity of brown paper sufficed, and, having received her small pittance of wages, she returned home.
This store was now nearly exhausted, and she had found a milliner who gave her a miserable pittance for toiling with her needle eight or ten hours each day.
Amelia thinks, and thinks, and racks her brain, to find some means of increasing the small pittance upon which the household is starving.
Robert is very well in a way, to give up all the money he can earn to the family, and keep the barest pittance for himself.
A puny, miserable little creature like Dickenson could prate of happiness and turn a shining face to the future - Dickenson who lived upon a pittance, who depended upon the whim of his employer, and who confessed to ambitions which were surely pitiable.
She procured plain work; she plaited straw and by various means contrived to earn a pittance scarcely sufficient to support life.
As soon as they have completed the term of eighty years, they are looked on as dead in law; their heirs immediately succeed to their estates; only a small pittance is reserved for their support; and the poor ones are maintained at the public charge.
They had no provisions left but a few dried salmon, yet finding the white men equally in want, they generously offered to share even this meager pittance, and frequently repeated the offer, with an earnestness that left no doubt of their sincerity.