pituri


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Related to pituri: Duboisia hopwoodii

pituri

(ˈpɪtʃərɪ)
n, pl -ris
(Plants) an Australian solanaceous shrub, Duboisia hopwoodii, the leaves of which are the source of a narcotic used by the native Australians
[C19: from a native Australian name]
References in periodicals archive ?
Although these exclusive access rights are rare in Aboriginal societies, limited examples include ethnographic evidence of a man claiming exclusive access to a waterhole (Keen 2004:280); the assertion of exclusive use rights of honey trees by demarcating the tree (Keen 2004:285); and the trade in the pituri simulant, where Aboriginal groups maintained an economic monopoly by keeping preparation methods secret (Keen 2004:356).
Jeanette Hoorn, 'White Lubra/White Savage: Pituri and Colonialist Fantasy in Charles Chauvel's Uncivilised (1936)', Post Script, vol.
Subjects covered include medicinal flowers, particularly the daisy family, validation and new research on traditional remedies, soil quality and ingestion, desert-specific plants, nightshades, tobacco as a medicine, steroidal substances in food plants, and the atypical narcotic pituri.
Psychoactive substances of the South Seas: betel, kava and pituri.
The second period of change occurs during the last millennium, when there is increasing segmentation of rock art and the development of "long-transfer systems" involving axes, grindstones, ochre, pituri and leilira blades.
Coca was domesticated in the western Andes close to 7,000 years ago, and the consumption of tobacco in the Americas, pituri in Australia, and khat in Eastern Africa already represented ancient practices when European colonists made first contact, perhaps dating back 40,000 years or more.
Australian Aboriginal people used the plant pituri (Duboisia hopwoodil) for its nicotine content, as well as the plant Nicotiana gossei, which is a stimulant (Sullivan & Hagen 2002: 390; Watson 1983).
It is with the last category, drugs, that I found reports of the intentional use of psychedelic plants for psychic experiences across all five continents, from the use of nicotine-rich pituri (Duboisia hopwoodii) by indigenous Australians (Australian Institute of Parapsychological Research, 2004) and datura (Datura metel) on the Indian subcontinent (Schuhes & Hofmann, 1992), to the use of iboga (Tabernanthe iboga) in central Africa (Pinchbeck, 2002), Syrian rue (Peganum harmala) in north Africa and the Middle East (Rudgley, 1998), mandrake (Mandragora officinarum) in Europe (Muller-Ebeling, Rfitsch, & Storl, 2003), and fly-agaric (Amanita muscaria) mushrooms in Siberia (Rudgley, 1998) and north America (Wasson, 1979).
Australian aborigines used nicotine from both the pituri plant (Duboisia hopwoodii) and Nicotiana gossel before the arrival of Europeans, as did Native Americans (from native Nicotiana tabacum and Nicotiana rustica) [6, 9].
Duboisia hopwoodii, the pituri bush, was one of the most important plants of commerce among pre-contact Aboriginal people and complex trading routes existed which were well recognised across tribal boundaries.
White Lubra / White Savage: Pituri and Colonialist Fantasy in Charles Chauvel's Uncivilised.
The dunes have a scattered-to-moderate overstorey of mulga (Acacia aneura), white cypress pine (Callitris glaucophylla), red box (Eucalyptus intertexta), and rosewood (Alectryou oleifolius) and locally dense stands of narrow-leafed hopbush and pituri (Duboisia hopwoodii).