pitying


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pit·y

 (pĭt′ē)
n. pl. pit·ies
1. Sympathy and sorrow aroused by the misfortune or suffering of another.
2. A matter of regret: It's a pity she can't attend the reception.
v. pit·ied, pit·y·ing, pit·ies
v.tr.
To feel pity for or on account of: "No, he could not believe it a bad house; not such a house as a man was to be pitied for having" (Jane Austen)."An office worker pitied his confinement and slipped in to give him a loaf of bread" (Eric Scigliano).
v.intr.
To feel pity.
Idiom:
have/take pity on
To show compassion for.

[Middle English pite, from Old French, from Latin pietās, piety, compassion, from pius, dutiful.]

pit′y·ing·ly adv.
Synonyms: pity, compassion, sympathy, empathy, commiseration, condolence
These nouns signify kindly concern aroused by the misfortune, affliction, or suffering of another. Pity often implies a feeling of sorrow that inclines one to help or to show mercy. The word usually suggests that the person feeling pity is better off or in a superior position to the person who is the object of pity: "Going with her mother everywhere, she saw what Althea did not: how the other women invited her out of pity" (Kate Wheeler).
Compassion denotes deep awareness of the suffering of another and the wish to relieve it: "Compassion is not weakness, and concern for the unfortunate is not socialism" (Hubert H. Humphrey).
Sympathy denotes the act of or capacity for sharing in the sorrows or troubles of another: "They had little sympathy to spare for their unfortunate enemies" (William Hickling Prescott).
Empathy is an identification with and understanding of another's situation, feelings, and motives: Having changed schools several times as a child, I feel empathy for the transfer students. Commiseration often entails the expression of pity or sorrow: expressed their commiseration over the failure of the experiment. Condolence is formal, conventional sympathy, usually toward a person who has experienced the loss of a loved one: sent a letter of condolence to the bereaved family.

Pitying

 of turtledoves: modern version of a dole of dovesBk. of St. Albans, 1486.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

pitying

adjective
Feeling or expressing pity:
Archaic: piteous, pitiful.
Translations

pitying

[ˈpɪtɪɪŋ] ADJ (= compassionate) [look, smile] → lleno de compasión, compasivo; (= contemptuous) [look, smile] → de desprecio

pitying

[ˈpɪtiɪŋ] adj [look] → compatissant(e)

pitying

adj, pityingly
advmitleidig; glance alsobedauernd; (with contempt) → verächtlich

pitying

[ˈpɪtɪɪŋ] adjcompassionevole; (with contempt) → di commiserazione
References in periodicals archive ?
Sometimes I find it hard to decide if I take part of my capacity for pitying those who are surrounded with intense feelings of helplessness and extend it to those who crave power at the expense of oppressing others out of sheer disgust or compassion.
judged or I don't like pity 5 you know if I confide in somebody I am not confiding and 6 expecting a lot of pity from anybody (I/mm mm) 7 hhh I don't like somebody pitying me (I/mm mm) 8 I like somebody who will offer me and then [?
We may pity others because we dare not own to pitying ourselves; or we may pity ourselves because we feel we are not getting enough pity (although, probably, we would call it sympathy because otherwise we would be walking on coals, heaping coals of fire upon our heads) from others; even more probably, we cannot tell the difference.