placebo effect


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placebo effect

n.
The beneficial effect in a patient following a particular treatment that arises from the patient's expectations concerning the treatment rather than from the treatment itself.

placebo effect

n
(Medicine) med a positive therapeutic effect claimed by a patient after receiving a placebo believed by him to be an active drug. See control group

pla•ce′bo effect`

(pləˈsi boʊ)
n.
a reaction to a placebo manifested by a lessening of symptoms or the production of anticipated side effects.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.placebo effect - any effect that seems to be a consequence of administering a placebo; the change is usually beneficial and is assumed result from the person's faith in the treatment or preconceptions about what the experimental drug was supposed to do; pharmacologists were the first to talk about placebo effects but now the idea has been generalized to many situations having nothing to do with drugs
consequence, effect, result, upshot, outcome, event, issue - a phenomenon that follows and is caused by some previous phenomenon; "the magnetic effect was greater when the rod was lengthwise"; "his decision had depressing consequences for business"; "he acted very wise after the event"
Translations
lumevaikutusplasebovaikutus

placebo effect

References in periodicals archive ?
Q You keep going on about the placebo effect but I really don't understand what you mean.
The placebo effect continues to puzzle medical researchers and neuroscientists in the west.
He concluded that most of the therapeutic effect of drugs was from the placebo effect (defined below) and the natural tendency of the body to heal itself (vis medicatrix naturae).
He said this was in part due to the sizeable placebo effect in this trial.
A human error in initial endoscopy reads by the original vendor which was characterized by an unusually high placebo effect (4/17, 23.5%) had led to the original futile outcome reported in March 2018.
Don't dismiss the placebo effect. Eighty-three patients with chronic low back pain were randomized to either continue their current pain medications or to continue their current pain medication plus a placebo tablet twice daily for 3 weeks.
It was suggested that the placebo response in clinical trials represents more than just regression to the mean and passage of time;[11] well-learned and definitely understood placebo effect are likely to be related to better design and execution of diabetes trials in Asian and Caucasian populations.[12],[13]
Could the advantageous outcomes for the initial PCI strategy seen in FAME 2 possibly have been due to a placebo effect?
Using a mediation analysis, it has been shown that conditioning is highly related to expectancy and expectancy predicts the placebo effect, while the direct effect of conditioning on the placebo effect is no longer significant [38].
According to the definition of Clark, Hopkins, Hawley and Burke (2000), the placebo effect is a favorable outcome triggered by an expectation.
When subjected to scientific scrutiny, the overwhelming majority of treatments have turned out to be devoid of intrinsic therapeutic value; they derived their benefits from the placebo effect. Despite these benefits, the term "placebo" comes with unfortunate baggage.
Everyone's familiar with the placebo effect that occurs when drugs produce beneficial results that can't be attributed to the properties of the treatment.