plagiarism

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pla·gia·rism

 (plā′jə-rĭz′əm)
n.
1. The act or behavior of plagiarizing.
2. An instance of plagiarizing, especially a passage that is taken from the work of one person and reproduced in the work of another without attribution.

[From plagiary.]

pla′gia·rist n.
pla′gia·ris′tic adj.

plagiarism

(ˈpleɪdʒəˌrɪzəm)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the act of plagiarizing
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) something plagiarized
ˈplagiarist n
ˌplagiaˈristic adj

pla•gia•rism

(ˈpleɪ dʒəˌrɪz əm, -dʒi əˌrɪz-)

n.
1. the unauthorized use of the language and thoughts of another author and the representation of them as one's own.
2. something used and represented in this manner.
[1615–25]
pla′gia•rist, n.
pla`gia•ris′tic, adj.

plagiarism

1. the verbatim copying or imitation of the language, ideas, or thoughts of another author and representing them as one’s own original work.
2. the material so appropriated. Also plagiary.plagiarist, n.plagiaristic, adj.
See also: Theft
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.plagiarism - a piece of writing that has been copied from someone else and is presented as being your own work
piece of writing, written material, writing - the work of a writer; anything expressed in letters of the alphabet (especially when considered from the point of view of style and effect); "the writing in her novels is excellent"; "that editorial was a fine piece of writing"
2.plagiarism - the act of plagiarizing; taking someone's words or ideas as if they were your own
copyright infringement, infringement of copyright - a violation of the rights secured by a copyright

plagiarism

noun copying, borrowing, theft, appropriation, infringement, piracy, lifting (informal), cribbing (informal) He's accused of plagiarism.
Quotations
"If you steal from one author, it's plagiarism; if you steal from many, it's research" [Wilson Mizner]
Translations
plagiátorství
plagiering
plágium
剽窃盗作
eser hırsızlığı

plagiarism

[ˈpleɪdʒɪərɪzəm] Nplagio m

plagiarism

[ˈpleɪdʒərɪzəm] nplagiat m

plagiarism

nPlagiat nt

plagiarism

[ˈpleɪdʒjəˌrɪzm] nplagio

plagiarize,

plagiarise

(ˈpleidʒəraiz) verb
to copy texts or take ideas from someone else's work and use them as if they were one's own.
ˈplagiarism (ˈpleidʒərizəm) noun
She was found guilty of plagiarism.
References in classic literature ?
The effect ought logically to have been ruinous for the plagiarist, but it was really nothing of the kind.
ISLAMABAD -- A Senate committee was informed on Thursday that the Higher Education Commission (HEC) was not only imposing penalties on plagiarists but also taking action against those who filed false cases of plagiarism against academicians.
Plagiarism can be managed by a balance among its prevention, detection by plagiarism detection software, and institutional sanctions against proven plagiarists.
Siriani will consider how architects and interior designers can safeguard their concept ideas, completed projects, and interior and exterior architecture from plagiarists with the use of trademarks, patents, and copyright.
Incidentally, since I began punning in The Sunday Times in 1971, plagiarists such as Crosbie, Brandbreth and others have regularly raided my first (A pun my soul ) and second books with little or no acknowledgment: some pieces have even appeared in collections of graffiti.
In both cases, the plagiarists insisted (huffily) that they had never even seen my work (sort of like the Trump campaign originally denying that any part of Melania's speech was derived from Michelle Obama's).
She did make it clear in the days when she worked for Dawn that she had no patience for lazy plagiarists.
But at an SSC, even the plagiarists are accomplished, well-seasoned military professionals, many of whom have held command over thousands, rendered decisions impacting human life, assumed responsibility for multimillion-dollar equipment, and generally devoted their careers to the service of the Nation.
We fire plagiarists on the spot and shove photographers out the door for Photoshopping.
Licensed for public performance, A Fragile Trust: Plagiarism, Power, and Jayson Blair at the New York Times is a documentary about the shocking true story of Jayson Blair, one of the most infamous serial plagiarists of the modern day.
As stated in this writer's book, "The Beatles: Extraordinary Plagiarists" (2009), John Lennon and Paul McCartney admitted they were plagiarists, termed as "plagiarists extraordinaire" by McCartney.
The public can only conclude that the institutional silence signified consent to the characterization of the Senate as a den of plagiarists.