plaid


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plaid
clockwise from top left: Malcolm, Gordon Dress, and Stewart Dress plaid patterns

plaid

 (plăd)
n.
1.
a. Cloth, often made of wool, with a tartan or checked pattern.
b. A pattern of this kind.
2. A rectangular woolen scarf of a tartan pattern worn over the left shoulder by Scottish Highlanders.

[Probably Scots plaid, plyd, past participle of ply, to fold, from Middle English plien; see ply1.]

plaid, plaid′ed adj.

plaid

(plæd; pleɪd)
n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) a long piece of cloth of a tartan pattern, worn over the shoulder as part of Highland costume
2. (Textiles)
a. a crisscross weave or cloth
b. (as modifier): a plaid scarf.
[C16: from Scottish Gaelic plaide, of obscure origin]

plaid

(plæd)

n.
1. any fabric woven of differently colored yarns in a cross-barred pattern.
2. a pattern of this kind.
3. a long, rectangular piece of cloth, usu. with such a pattern and worn across the left shoulder by Scottish Highlanders.
adj.
4. having the pattern of a plaid.
Compare tartan.
[1505–15; < Scottish Gaelic plaide blanket, plaid (definition 3)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.plaid - a cloth having a crisscross designplaid - a cloth having a crisscross design  
cloth, fabric, textile, material - artifact made by weaving or felting or knitting or crocheting natural or synthetic fibers; "the fabric in the curtains was light and semitransparent"; "woven cloth originated in Mesopotamia around 5000 BC"; "she measured off enough material for a dress"
Translations

plaid

[plæd]
A. N (= cloth) → tela f escocesa or a cuadros; (= cloak) → manta f escocesa, plaid m
B. CPD [skirt, trousers, shirt] → escocés

plaid

[ˈplæd ˈpleɪd]
n
(= material) → tissu m écossais
(= pattern) → motif m écossais
(= tartan worn over the shoulder) → plaid m
modif [shirt, jacket] → à carreaux
a plaid shirt → une chemise écossaise, une chemise à carreaux

plaid

nPlaid nt; plaid skirtkarierter Rock

plaid

[plæd] n (material) → tessuto scozzese; (cloak) → plaid m inv
a plaid shirt → una camicia scozzese
References in classic literature ?
He had about him, he says, a trusty plaid; an old and valued travelling companion and comforter; upon which the rains had descended, and the snows and winds beaten, without further effect than somewhat to tarnish its primitive lustre.
His boots were, on a small scale, the boots of a ploughman, while his legs, so crossed and recrossed with scratches that they looked like maps, were bare below a very short pair of plaid drawers finished off with two frills of perfectly different patterns.
In the afternoon Lord George came forth again, dressed in a black velvet coat, and trousers and waistcoat of the Gordon plaid, all of the same Quaker cut; and in this costume, which made him look a dozen times more strange and singular than before, went down on foot to Westminster.
A soldier, roused by the noise, unrolled his plaid, and looked up to see what was going forward.
I can remember Miss Temple walking lightly and rapidly along our drooping line, her plaid cloak, which the frosty wind fluttered, gathered close about her, and encouraging us, by precept and example, to keep up our spirits, and march forward, as she said, "like stalwart soldiers." The other teachers, poor things, were generally themselves too much dejected to attempt the task of cheering others.
A stormy evening of olive and silver was closing in, as Father Brown, wrapped in a grey Scotch plaid, came to the end of a grey Scotch valley and beheld the strange castle of Glengyle.
He touched the brim of the old plaid bicycle cap perched on the back of his head.
On the left of his great leader sat the poetic Snodgrass, and near him again the sporting Winkle; the former poetically enveloped in a mysterious blue cloak with a canine-skin collar, and the latter communicating additional lustre to a new green shooting-coat, plaid neckerchief, and closely-fitted drabs.
She looked demure and pretty, and made a graceful picture in her blue cashmere dress and little blue hat, with a plaid shawl drawn neatly about her shoulders and a clumsy pocket-book in her hand.
Robinson's red plaid shawl, and Deacon Milliken's wig, on crooked, the bare benches and torn hymn-books, the hanging texts and maps, were no longer visible, and she saw blue skies and burning stars, white turbans and gay colors; Mr.
"Unless the little man in the plaid mackintosh poured it into the coffee with the milk," she said, "I could not possibly have imbibed it, for I haven't spoken to another soul since we left."
It consisted of a brown body-coat with a great many brass buttons up the front and only one behind, a bright check neckerchief, a plaid waistcoat, soiled white trousers, and a very limp hat, worn with the wrong side foremost, to hide a hole in the brim.