plainsman

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plains·man

 (plānz′mən)
n.
An inhabitant or a settler of the plains, especially of the prairie regions of the United States.

plainsman

(ˈpleɪnzmən)
n, pl -men
(Human Geography) a person who lives in a plains region, esp in the Great Plains of North America

plains•man

(ˈpleɪnz mən)

n., pl. -men.
an inhabitant of the plains.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.plainsman - an inhabitant of a plains region (especially the Great Plains of North America)plainsman - an inhabitant of a plains region (especially the Great Plains of North America)
North America - a continent (the third largest) in the western hemisphere connected to South America by the Isthmus of Panama
denizen, dweller, habitant, inhabitant, indweller - a person who inhabits a particular place
Translations

plainsman

[ˈpleɪnzmən] N (plainsmen (pl)) → llanero m, hombre m de la llanura

plainsman

n pl <-men> → Flachländer m
References in classic literature ?
The lama dropped to his knees, half-stunned; the coolies under their loads fled up the hill as fast as plainsmen run aross the level.
At the instant that the man fell a half dozen fierce plainsmen sprang into the room from where they had apparently been waiting for their cue in the street before the cafe.
"Among others in the mix of potential names were the Plainsmen but the powers that be believed the name Crusaders reflected the crusading spirit of Canterbury rugby," the team website says.
In Assam and the North East, the fault line is not caste but Bengalis versus Assamese and plainsmen versus the tribes.
The first section of the novel, comprising well over half its entire length, describes the narrator's saloon-bar encounter with a group of wealthy landowners (or "plainsmen"--they are all men), one of whom agrees to become his patron.
(6) Considerado por Schaeffer como uno de los grandes clasicos de la ecologia cultural con su obra Northern Plainsmen: Adaptative Strategy and Agrarian Life (1976)
Like the plainsmen who came up as followers of the British and the eastern Nepalis who travelled across attracted by employment prospects in tea plantations, Tibetans and Sherpas took up work as "coolies" and "dandi bearers" for tourists after Darjeeling was established as a hill resort by the British East India Company.
No, no, I feel as the plainsmen feel, that they don't really belong in Australia.
He has been recalling his school days at Eston Grammar School and the time when he played in a local band called The Plainsmen.
Especially damaging to the patriot cause were the llaneros (plainsmen) of the Orinoco Basin.
Again, Riley concludes that "Plainswomen's employments were determined primarily by gender expectations--that is, what it was thought acceptable for women to work at--and they differed noticeably from the occupations of plainsmen" (Riley 1988, 121).