plainspoken

(redirected from plainspokenness)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

plain·spo·ken

 (plān′spō′kən)
adj.
Frank; straightforward; blunt.

plain′spo′ken·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.plainspoken - using simple and direct language; "a plainspoken country doctor"
unrhetorical - not rhetorical
2.plainspoken - characterized by directness in manner or speech; without subtlety or evasion; "blunt talking and straight shooting"; "a blunt New England farmer"; "I gave them my candid opinion"; "forthright criticism"; "a forthright approach to the problem"; "tell me what you think--and you may just as well be frank"; "it is possible to be outspoken without being rude"; "plainspoken and to the point"; "a point-blank accusation"
direct - straightforward in means or manner or behavior or language or action; "a direct question"; "a direct response"; "a direct approach"

plainspoken

adjective
References in periodicals archive ?
Fangio's all-business approach might not make for great TV, but it's appreciated by his players, who respect his unique blend of teaching, professionalism, experience, knowledge and plainspokenness.
Bringing a latter-day Precisionist approach to his figurings of the physical manifestations of American modernity, one whose flat plainspokenness also drew liberally on strategies from Pop and hard-edge abstraction, D'Arcangelo reimagined his surroundings as a psychogeographical terrain imbued with a certain kind of existential, even spiritual, longing.
Plainspokenness, as Dylan often engages it in the style of the great Chinese poets like Li Po, takes us to a manner of directness that is also the highest form of irony, though not narcissistic and self-involved; it is a mode of writing that is simply not available to us today.
Finkin argues that, by choosing to write sonnets in Yiddish, Mani Leyb shaped the hard-earned "plainspokenness" of a modern Yiddish poetic vernacular into the sonnets high-art European stanza.
His plainspokenness is an asset that Obama, a gifted speaker in his own right, but often seen as more professorial and distant, has lacked during his presidency."
Fish's subject matter bridges the mundane and the allegorical, tipping its hat to the Dutch vanitas tradition, while affirming a sense of American plainspokenness already present in her earliest paintings of produce in plastic wrapping.