biofilm

(redirected from plaque biofilm)
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bi·o·film

 (bī′ō-fĭlm′)
n.
A complex structure adhering to surfaces that are regularly in contact with water, consisting of colonies of bacteria that secrete a mucilaginous protective coating in which they are encased. Biofilms, which are resistant to antibiotics and disinfectants, corrode pipes and cause diseases such as lung infections, but they can be used beneficially to treat sewage, industrial waste, and contaminated soil.

biofilm

(ˈbaɪəʊˌfɪlm)
n
(Microbiology) a thin layer of living organisms
Translations
biofilm
References in periodicals archive ?
Extensive Range of Applications from Supragingival to Subgingival Use Perio-Mate removes plaque biofilm and moderate stains around the supragingival, gingival margin and in the pocket up to approximately 3mm, without use of the nozzle tip.
Plaque biofilm accumulation in the oral cavity is an essential etiologic factor of caries and gingivitis and plaque removal with a toothbrush has been shown to reverse the process of gingivitis.
Prior research has demonstrated elimination of microbial dental plaque biofilm prevents gingivitis and dental cavities.
Early dental caries can be prevented and controlled if the multiple causative factors, namely a susceptible tooth surface, the presence of cariogenic acid producing bacteria in dental plaque biofilm, and the exposure to ingested sugars, are reduced.
1) Periodontitis is a polymicrobial disease in which disease expression involves intricate interactions of the plaque biofilm with the host inflammatory response and subsequent alterations in bone and connective tissue metabolism.
It is one of the major causes of tooth loss in adults3,4 that affects human populations in many countries with high prevalence rate and plaque biofilm as being major factor in causing periodontal disease.
9% of plaque biofilm from the treated area in just three seconds.
The denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) is a quantitative and qualitative analysis of polymicrobial ecosystems such as plaque biofilm.
Germs in the mouth multiply and can become embedded in a thick layer called plaque biofilm.
Anton Van Leeuwenhoek scraped the plaque biofilm from his teeth and observed the "animalculi" that produced this microbial community with his primitive microscope.
utilized a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to evaluate the effectiveness of a Waterpik([R])dental water jet at removing plaque biofilm.