platonically


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Pla·ton·ic

 (plə-tŏn′ĭk, plā-)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or characteristic of Plato or his philosophy: Platonic dialogues; Platonic ontology.
2. often platonic Friendly or affectionate without involving sexual relations: platonic love.
3. often platonic Speculative or theoretical.

[After Plato.]

Pla·ton′i·cal·ly adv.
Translations

platonically

[pləˈtɒnɪklɪ] advplatonicamente
References in periodicals archive ?
It begins platonically. But it's clear that Anthony's planning to seduce Julie, and we wince in anticipation.
Consider a 35-year-old kidney cancer patient, abused by an aunt as a child, struggling with gender, sexually unhappy in marriage, who begins platonically writing poetry to a younger, enamored, co-worker, realizes his mistake, tells her he has to stop, and confesses to his wife, only to have his wife divorce him, and the younger woman smear his reputation and have him removed from his position for sexual harassment.
For the Western Church, in a Platonically influenced tradition, essence is conceived more concrete, something existing on its own (in an eternal way) and the existence of something is predicated upon its essence.
After widowed neighbors Addie (Jane Fonda) and Louis (Robert Redford) begin sleeping in bed together platonically to alleviate their loneliness, a real romance begins to blossom.
She had confided in me about it seeking advice on the matter as we were platonically close.
The two deal with their intertwining and complex feelings for one another, wondering if it's really love, or perhaps just a mix of comfort, security, and the desire not to hurt someone you love platonically, whose feelings might have become romantic.
Firstly, I had never been on a date with Susan - we'd met at a mindbending course in London just a month earlier and had only spoken platonically since then on the phone.
As a Platonically inclined thinker, Origen further sees an ontological inferiority of material earthly reality as compared to spiritual reality.
In Perelandra, when Weston becomes completely evil, we see him entirely devoid of knowledge and intellectual interest (his only Platonically redeeming quality)--we are told his evil is akin to the maliciousness of a particularly stupid child (Perelandra 128); this is consequent with the story, a Platonic fiction where knowledge leads to God.
The childish idea that men should no longer get together with women professionally or platonically at workplaces a at meetings, coffee breaks and all interactions a is a huge setback for women.
Add a kiss or 'moment' when it's clear they're viewing each other s3xually rather than platonically (and like what they see) and the work marriage suddenly turns into a real one.