platoon

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pla·toon

 (plə-to͞on′)
n.
1. A subdivision of a company of troops consisting of two or more squads or sections and usually commanded by a lieutenant.
2. A group of people working, traveling, or assembled together: a platoon of firefighters; buses carrying platoons of tourists.
3. Sports A group of players within a team, especially a football team, that is trained and sent into or withdrawn from play as a unit: the defensive platoon.
v. pla·tooned, pla·toon·ing, pla·toons Sports
v.tr.
To play (a player) in alternation with another player in the same position: platooned the two catchers.
v.intr.
1. To use alternate players at the same position.
2. To take turns playing a position with another player.

[French peloton, from Old French, diminutive of pelote, ball; see pellet.]

platoon

(pləˈtuːn)
n
1. (Military) military a subunit of a company usually comprising three sections of ten to twelve men: commanded by a lieutenant
2. a group or unit of people, esp one sharing a common activity, characteristic, etc
[C17: from French peloton little ball, group of men, from pelote ball; see pellet]

pla•toon

(pləˈtun)

n.
1. a military unit consisting of two or more squads or sections and a headquarters.
2. a small unit of a police force.
3. a company or group: a platoon of visitors.
4. Football. a group of players specially trained in one aspect of the game, as offense or defense.
v.t.
5. Sports.
a. to use (a player) at a position in a game alternately with another player.
b. to alternate (two different teams or units).
v.i.
6. Sports.
a. to alternate at a position with another player.
b. to use players alternately at the same position.
c. to alternate different teams.
[1630–40; earlier plotton < French peloton little ball, group, platoon, diminutive of pelote ball. See pellet, -oon]

Platoon

 a squad; a company or set of people, 1711; a small body of soldiers; a burst of gunfire or the like.
Examples: platoon of arguments, 1775; of gunfire (a volley), 1747; of musketeers, 1637; of people, 1841; of troops, 1727.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.platoon - a military unit that is a subdivision of a companyplatoon - a military unit that is a subdivision of a company; usually has a headquarters and two or more squads; usually commanded by a lieutenant
army unit - a military unit that is part of an army
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
company - small military unit; usually two or three platoons
2.platoon - a team of policemen working under the military platoon system
police squad, squad - a small squad of policemen trained to deal with a particular kind of crime
section - a small team of policemen working as part of a police platoon
3.platoon - a group of persons who are engaged in a common activity; "platoons of tourists poured out of the busses"; "the defensive platoon of the football team"
social group - people sharing some social relation

platoon

noun squad, company, group, team, outfit (informal), patrol, squadron a platoon of armed soldiers
Translations
فَصيلَة من الجُنْد
četarota
deling
joukkue
flokksdeild
vads

platoon

[pləˈtuːn] N (Mil) → pelotón m, sección f

platoon

[pləˈtuːn]
nsection f
modif [commander, leader] → de section

platoon

n (Mil) → Zug m

platoon

[pləˈtuːn] n (Mil) → plotone m

platoon

(pləˈtuːn) noun
a section of a company of soldiers.
References in periodicals archive ?
Scania is among the key stakeholders collaborating in a new Swedish research project into truck platooning.
Transport minister Paul Maynard said: "Advances such as lorry platooning could benefit businesses through cheaper fuel bills and other road users thanks to lower emissions and less congestion.
In this paper we focus on the role of platooning for combination trucks (1) in the United States, one of the most promising C AV technologies that could experience widespread adoption in the next 5 to 10 years.
2) This newly available information allows a definitive assessment that not only did Stallings in fact begin platooning in 1913, several other managers did so as well.
The truck platooning concept enabled by automated driving technologies has been hailed as the future of the transportation industry.
While Daimler has a habit of stealing the limelight when it comes to the testing future technologies on the Autobahn, six top truck manufacturers, including Volvo, Iveco, Scania, MAN and DAF Trucks are participating in the 'European Truck Platooning Challenge' initiated by the Dutch government as part of their EU presidency to demonstrate platooning technology.
In early April a series of convoys of smart lorries left various countries to head to Rotterdam, as part of the Truck Platooning Challenge: Europe's first cross-border test of semi-autonomous trucks.
The UK Department for Transport has commissioned research to understand how platooning technology, which enables road vehicles to move as a group, might benefit UK business, the transport network, road safety and the environment.
Researchers from the University of California, Berkeley unveiled a concept called platooning, which has cars traveling close together in a pack, tailgating each other at a distance determined by computers.
Truck platooning could save cost, congestion and carbon says the Freight Transport Association, members of which operate more than 200,000 trucks on Britains roads.
Volvo Trucks has participated in the 'European Truck Platooning Challenge' initiated by the Dutch Presidency to drive a truck convoy separated by just a one-second gap in order to boost efficiency.
And it could also cut congestion as platooning could increase the stability of the traffic itself, resulting in less oscillation of traffic flow.