plausibility


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plau·si·ble

 (plô′zə-bəl)
adj.
1. Seemingly or apparently valid, likely, or acceptable; credible: a plausible excuse.
2. Persuasive or ingratiating, especially in an effort to deceive.

[Latin plausibilis, deserving applause, from plausus, past participle of plaudere, to applaud.]

plau′si·bil′i·ty, plau′si·ble·ness n.
plau′si·bly adv.
Synonyms: plausible, believable, credible
These adjectives mean appearing to merit belief or acceptance: a plausible pretext; a believable excuse; a credible assertion.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.plausibility - apparent validity
believability, credibility, credibleness - the quality of being believable or trustworthy
tenability, tenableness, reasonableness - the quality of being plausible or acceptable to a reasonable person; "he questioned the tenability of my claims"
implausibility, implausibleness - the quality of provoking disbelief
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

plausibility

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

plausibility

[ˌplɔːzəˈbɪlɪtɪ] N [of argument] → verosimilitud f; [of person] → credibilidad f
his plausibility is such thathabla tan bien que ...
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

plausibility

[ˌplɔːzɪˈbɪlɪti] n (= credibility) → plausibilité f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

plausibility

nPlausibilität f; (of story, excuse also)Glaubwürdigkeit f; (of liar)Geschicktheit f; (of manner, person)überzeugende Art
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

plausibility

[ˌplɔːzəˈbɪlɪtɪ] n (of argument, story) → plausibilità
he lacks plausibility → non è convincente
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
In support of the plausibility of this conjecture, it further occurred to her that the forbidden gallery, in which lay the apartments of the unfortunate Mrs.
The logical plausibility of it, that made an appeal to his intellect, seemed missed by Kreis and Hamilton, who sneered at Norton as a metaphysician, and who, in turn, sneered back at them as metaphysicians.
In all the tribe there was but one who was at all skeptical about the plausibility of Tarzan's remarkable rescue of Goro, and that one, strange as it may seem, was Tarzan of the Apes.
That feeling of life- emptiness which had made me so restless for the last few months lost its bitter plausibility, its evil influence, dissolved in a flow of joyous emotion.
It may be said that the tactile images are merely present, without any accompanying belief; but I think this view, though sometimes correct, derives its plausibility as a general proposition from our thinking of explicit conscious belief only.
ESIODUS), to show how prejudiced and lacking even in plausibility such efforts are.
It may always be asked whether a writer of Romance makes his world seem convincingly real as we read or whether he frankly abandons all plausibility. The presence or absence of a supernatural element generally makes an important difference.
Pullet's observation with erroneous plausibility, "you must consider that, neighbor Tulliver; Wakem's son isn't likely to follow any business.
This was what gave plausibility to the whispers, that Mr.
There it was again--the same, familiar, disarming plausibility of Martin's, the old trick of making her seem to be the one in the wrong.
Its plausibility is marred a little by the fact that the Oracle was not a biblical student, and did not spend much of his time instructing himself about Scriptural localities.--They say the Oracle complains, in this hot weather, lately, that the only beverage in the ship that is passable, is the butter.
Evidence having a shade more of plausibility than of unlikelihood.