play on

(redirected from play upon)
Also found in: Legal, Idioms.

play on

vb (intr)
1. (adverb) to continue to play
2. (preposition) Also: play upon to exploit or impose upon (the feelings or weakness of another) to one's own advantage
3. (Cricket) (adverb) cricket to hit the ball into one's own wicket
Translations
يَلْعَبُ على الشُّعور
hrát na
udnytte
spila á
istismar etmekkendi çıkarı için kullanmak

w>play on

viweiterspielen
vi +prep obj (also play upon) (= exploit) sb’s fears, feelings, good naturegeschickt ausnutzen; (= emphasize) difficulties, similaritiesherausstreichen; the hours of waiting played on my nervesdas stundenlange Warten zermürbte mich; the author is playing on wordsder Autor macht Wortspiele/ein Wortspiel

play

(plei) verb
1. to amuse oneself. The child is playing in the garden; He is playing with his toys; The little girl wants to play with her friends.
2. to take part in (games etc). He plays football; He is playing in goal; Here's a pack of cards – who wants to play (with me)?; I'm playing golf with him this evening.
3. to act in a play etc; to act (a character). She's playing Lady Macbeth; The company is playing in London this week.
4. (of a play etc) to be performed. `Oklahoma' is playing at the local theatre.
5. to (be able to) perform on (a musical instrument). She plays the piano; Who was playing the piano this morning?; He plays (the oboe) in an orchestra.
6. (usually with on) to carry out or do (a trick). He played a trick on me.
7. (usually with at) to compete against (someone) in a game etc. I'll play you at tennis.
8. (of light) to pass with a flickering movement. The firelight played across the ceiling.
9. to direct (over or towards something). The firemen played their hoses over the burning house.
10. to put down or produce (a playing-card) as part of a card game. He played the seven of hearts.
noun
1. recreation; amusement. A person must have time for both work and play.
2. an acted story; a drama. Shakespeare wrote many great plays.
3. the playing of a game. At the start of today's play, England was leading India by fifteen runs.
4. freedom of movement (eg in part of a machine).
ˈplayer noun
ˈplayable adjective
(negative unplayable) (of a ground, pitch etc) not good enough for a game to be played on it. Because of the rain the referee decided the ground was not playable.
ˈplayful adjective
1. happy; full of the desire to play. a playful kitten.
2. joking; not serious. a playful remark.
ˈplayfully adverb
ˈplayfulness noun
ˈplayboy noun
a rich man who spends his time and money on pleasure.
ˈplayground noun
an area in which children can play in a park, outside a school etc.
ˈplaying-card noun
one of a pack of cards used in card games.
ˈplaying-field noun
a field which is specially prepared and used for sport.
ˈplaymate noun
a childhood friend.
ˈplaypen noun
a small wooden structure with bars on every side in which a small child can play safely.
ˈplayschool noun
an informal nursery school.
ˈplaything noun
a toy.
ˈplaytime noun
a set time for children to play (at school etc). The children go outside at playtime.
ˈplaywright noun
a person who writes plays. He is a famous playwright.
at play
playing. children at play.
bring/come into play
to (cause to) be used or exercised. The job allowed him to bring all his talents into play.
child's play
something that is very easy. Of course you can do it – it's child's play!
in play, out of play
(of a ball) according to the rules of the game, (not) in a position where it can be hit, kicked etc.
play at
1. to pretend to be etc. The children were playing at cowboys and Indians.
2. used when asking angrily what someone is doing. What does he think he's playing at (=doing)?
play back to play (music, speech etc) on a record or tape after it has just been recorded (noun ˈplay-back)
play down
to try to make (something) appear less important. He played down the fact that he had failed the exam.
play fair
to act honestly and fairly.
play for time
to delay an action, decision etc in the hope that conditions will improve.
play havoc with
to cause a lot of damage to. The storm played havoc with the farmer's crops.
play into someone's hands
to do exactly what an opponent or enemy wants one to do.
play off (in games) to play a final deciding game after a draw (noun ˈplay-off)
play off against
to set (one person) against (another) in order to gain an advantage. He played his father off against his mother to get more pocket money.
play on
to make use of (someone's feelings, fears etc). He played on my sympathy until I lent him $10.
play a/no part in
(not) to be one of the people who are doing (something). He played no part in the robbery.
play safe
to take no risks.
play the game
to act fairly and honestly.
play up
to be troublesome or disobedient. The children are playing up today.
References in classic literature ?
We will now determine whether it is proper that children should be taught to sing, and play upon any instrument, which we have before made a matter of doubt.
Then the countryman rejoiced at his good luck, and said, 'I like many things better than money: first, I will have a bow that will bring down everything I shoot at; secondly, a fiddle that will set everyone dancing that hears me play upon it; and thirdly, I should like that everyone should grant what I ask.
No,' said he, 'I do not ask my life; only to let me play upon my fiddle for the last time.
The old woman counselled her to go to the mill-pond the next full moon and play upon a golden flute, and then to lay the flute on the bank.
A few moments later, a queer sight amongst all these untoward and unexpected happenings, a fire engine dashed under the arch, narrowly missing the broken fragments of brick and stone, swung around, and a dozen fire-hoses commenced to play upon the flaming building.
While still warm, the oil, like hot punch, is received into the six-barrel casks; and while, perhaps, the ship is pitching and rolling this way and that in the midnight sea, the enormous casks are slewed round and headed over, end for end, and sometimes perilously scoot across the slippery deck, like so many land slides, till at last man-handled and stayed in their course; and all round the hoops, rap, rap, go as many hammers as can play upon them, for now, ex officio, every sailor is a cooper.
I am already far north of London, and as I walk in the streets of Petersburgh, I feel a cold northern breeze play upon my cheeks, which braces my nerves and fills me with delight.
I suppose Becky was discontented with the new piano her husband had hired for her, or perhaps the proprietors of that instrument had fetched it away, declining farther credit, or perhaps she had a particular attachment for the one which she had just tried to purchase, recollecting it in old days, when she used to play upon it, in the little sitting-room of our dear Amelia Sedley.
Sedley; and with respect to the piano, as it had been Amelia's, and as she might miss it and want one now, and as Captain William Dobbin could no more play upon it than he could dance on the tight rope, it is probable that he did not purchase the instrument for his own use.
Like their predecessors they play upon a noyse of shawms, ancestors of the oboebassoon family, and characteristic instruments of waits before 1600.
He is making life more difficult for honest immigrants who are often the victims of the terrorists, but tremendously more easy for homicidal terrorists who will play upon the conflict and legalistic disparity between the practical application of different laws of different nations, to their maximum advantage.
We should give players with artistry, imagination and guile a platform to play upon.