plenitudinous


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plen·i·tude

 (plĕn′ĭ-to͞od′, -tyo͞od′)
n.
1. An ample amount or quantity; an abundance: a region blessed with a plenitude of natural resources.
2. The condition of being full, ample, or complete.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin plēnitūdō, from plēnus, full; see pelə- in Indo-European roots.]

plen′i·tu′di·nous (-to͞od′n-əs, -tyo͞od′-) adj.

plenitudinous

(ˌplɛnɪˈtjuːdɪnəs)
adj
characterized by plenitude or abundance

plen•i•tu•di•nous

(ˌplɛn ɪˈtud n əs, -ˈtyud-)

adj.
1. characterized by plenitude.
2. stout or portly.
[1805–15]
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plenitudinous

adjective
References in periodicals archive ?
Any worlds semantics for intentionality has to provide a plenitudinous theory of impossibility: For any impossible proposition, it should provide a world where it is true.
rival, plenitudinous mode of "exemplary representativeness,"
(3) To get an intuitive grip on the difference between modally coarse-grained objects and modally fine-grained objects, consider a modally fine-grained plenitudinous world.
However, without the excess surface energy provided by a columnar morphology to enable the highly directional and ballistic motion of the incoming Bi, a high deposition rate is needed to supply plenitudinous Bi timely for (fast) root growth [87].
But PLSDA is more complicated in modeling, it requires plenitudinous and representative samples for training, and it takes a long time for model optimization.
As a reader, his story is always partial, as is the reader of any of the four shaggy dog stories recounted in 'The Flaubert Bestiary.' And he is not a writer by trade, but a doctor (like Charles Bovary); in desiring a plenitudinous and complete account of Flaubert's voice as well as his biographical being, Braithwaite desires the omniscient position of the author over his domain, which includes the psychological motivations behind Emma Bovary's (and by extension, Ellen's) choices (and one doesn't even have to go that far, since, as we are told by Flaubert, "Madame Bovary, c'est moi").