pleonasm


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ple·o·nasm

 (plē′ə-năz′əm)
n.
1.
a. The use of more words than are required to express an idea; redundancy.
b. An instance of pleonasm.
2. A superfluous word or phrase.

[Late Latin pleonasmus, from Greek pleonasmos, from pleonazein, to be excessive, from pleōn, more; see pelə- in Indo-European roots.]

ple′o·nas′tic (-năs′tĭk) adj.
ple′o·nas′ti·cal·ly adv.

pleonasm

(ˈpliːəˌnæzəm)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the use of more words than necessary or an instance of this, such as a tiny little child
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a word or phrase that is superfluous
[C16: from Latin pleonasmus, from Greek pleonasmos excess, from pleonazein to be redundant]
ˌpleoˈnastic, ˌpleoˈnastical adj
ˌpleoˈnastically adv

ple•o•nasm

(ˈpli əˌnæz əm)

n.
1. the use of more words than are necessary to express an idea; redundancy.
2. an instance of this, as free gift.
[1580–90; < Late Latin pleonasmus < Greek pleonasmós redundancy, surplus, derivative of pleonázein to be more than enough, derivative of pleíōn more]
ple`o•nas′tic, adj.
ple`o•nas′ti•cal•ly, adv.

pleonasm

1. the use of unnecessary words to express an idea; redundancy.
2. an instance of this, as true fact.
3. a redundant word or expression. — pleonastic, adj.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices
1. the use of unnecessary words to express an idea; redundancy.
2. an instance of this, as true fact.
3. a redundant word or expression. — pleonastic, adj.
See also: Language

pleonasm

A superfluous word or phrase, or the use of more words than necessary.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pleonasm - using more words than necessary; "a tiny little child"
verboseness, verbosity - an expressive style that uses excessive or empty words

pleonasm

noun
Words or the use of words in excess of those needed for clarity or precision:
Translations
pleonasmus
pleonazmusszinonimahalmozásszószaporítás

pleonasm

[ˈpliːənæzəm] Npleonasmo m

pleonasm

nPleonasmus m
References in periodicals archive ?
They cover the historical background of the Asia Minor dialects; agglutinative noun inflection in Cappadocian; two Turkish suffixes in Pharasoit: constraints against phrasal bases; the morphology of Silliot: paradigmatic defectiveness, paradigmatic leveling; and affix pleonasm; adverbial constructions in a dialectical context: a case study from Pontic; the Smyrna dialect: loanword adaptation in a multilingual setting; affixoids and verb borrowing in Aivaliot morphology; subtractive imperative forms in Bithynian Greek; morphological innovations in Propontis Tsakonian; and the Greek of Ottoman-era Adrianoupolis.
A Periphrasis B Peripeteia C Phoneme D Pleonasm 11.
Vestibular paroxysmia appears to be similar to pleonasm. All peripheral vestibulopathies are most commonly paroxysmal: Meniere and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, to name the most well-known.
"Thinking in Franciscan" almost confines us to a pleonasm, with such professors and doctors included, because Franciscan life so precisely marks a mode of thought in which its transcription into the form of concepts is never detached from its rootedness in a lived experience issuing from the earth (humus), made of "humility" at the same time that it is fiercely laid claim to.
Untidy ruckles in Edith Grossman's translation keep tripping up the reader -- "an intense going and coming" sounds pretty much the wrong way round, and "French champagne" is a pleonasm, there being no other sort.
Of course, you knew there would be a word to describe the use of more words than are necessary to convey meaning: pleonasm.
As a card-carrying grammar nerd, I welcomed the "linguistic rant" against pleonasm but must point out a few ironies in the piece ("Destroying 'totally destroy,'" Sept.
Chittick wants us to concentrate on the message, not on the decorative filigree of extensive apparatus reflecting scholarly credentials (which in this case would be pleonasm).
For me, GH should be a pleonasm, it should belong to all.
More specifically, it is a form of linguistic error called pleonasm. Lehmann (2005) suggests that authors may sometimes choose to include redundant information in order to underscore a particular aspect of a word's meaning.
18) "[h]uman action is necessarily always rational." Consequently, in the Austrian view, irrational behavior is impossible by definition; hence, rational behavior must be seen as a pleonasm. (29) In turn, since every action aims to satisfy individual desires and "nobody is in the position to substitute his own value judgments for those of the acting individual" (Mises, 1998, p.
Derived from the Greek term [phrase omitted] 'superabundance, excess', a pleonasm is used in linguistics to denote a particular type of redundant linguistic expression, either as a fault of style, or as a figure purposely used for special force or clearness (OED s.v.