pleonastic


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ple·o·nasm

 (plē′ə-năz′əm)
n.
1.
a. The use of more words than are required to express an idea; redundancy.
b. An instance of pleonasm.
2. A superfluous word or phrase.

[Late Latin pleonasmus, from Greek pleonasmos, from pleonazein, to be excessive, from pleōn, more; see pelə- in Indo-European roots.]

ple′o·nas′tic (-năs′tĭk) adj.
ple′o·nas′ti·cal·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.pleonastic - repetition of same sense in different words; "`a true fact' and `a free gift' are pleonastic expressions"; "the phrase `a beginner who has just started' is tautological"; "at the risk of being redundant I return to my original proposition"- J.B.Conant
prolix - tediously prolonged or tending to speak or write at great length; "editing a prolix manuscript"; "a prolix lecturer telling you more than you want to know"

pleonastic

adjective
Using or containing an excessive number of words:
Translations
pleonasztikusszóhalmazószószaporító

pleonastic

[plɪəˈnæstɪk] ADJpleonástico

pleonastic

adjpleonastisch
References in periodicals archive ?
(16) The pleonastic term "relative valuation" fails to describe the special features of this approach sufficiently, since every valuation is in relative terms in the sense that it takes into account at least one alternative course of action.
In fact, the expression "democratic legal order" is almost pleonastic, because a democratic order is, by definition, legal.
The Constitution is best described as "circumlocutory" or "pleonastic." Some provisions are "circumbendibus." This is aggravated by the use of technical or ambiguous words pliable or dimensional in meanings and without accepted legal connotations.
Other parameters include the frequency of syllabic suffixes -ed and -eth; the use of disyllabic variants of suffixes -ion and -ious; the frequency of pleonastic verb "do" and of grammatical inversions; the frequency of alliterations; and the use of deviations from the metre to emphasize the meaning of the situation described in the line (not unlike onomatopoeia), for example, "Duck with French nods and apish courtesy" instead of something more "iambic," like: "Or duck with apish nods."
Out of the 30 occurrences, only one may be valued as neutral albeit pleonastic (popor de oameni [people of men]), all the other being associated with negative estimations related to:
Moving to example 7b, once the agent has hypothesized that it refers to the truck, it can penalize all senses of take whose subject must be either pleonastic (that is, nonreferential, as in It takes time to learn things well) or refer to a human.
The pleonastic threat underscores her unstable mindset and resolution to carry it out if he disregards her will.
He asked what 'on earth is the meaning of Fors Clavigera?'; pointed out that phrases such as 'workman and labourer' were pleonastic; and observed that needless digressions were, as in Tristram Shandy and Southey's Doctor, the rule (1871, 12).
While contradicting her previous stance, Lenor's pleonastic "true truth" displays itself as mere rhetorical facade here, a naive tautology that her own doubts about the pedagogical impact of the intellectuals on the people easily call into question.
The use of pleonastic that in the history of English can be safely ascribed to Lehman's category of hypercharacterization according to which the general subordinator that becomes spuriously added to all kinds of conjunctions and prepositions (Fischer 1992: 295), as in examples (1-2).