plosive


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Related to plosive: plosive speech sound

plo·sive

 (plō′sĭv, -zĭv)
adj.
Of, relating to, or being a speech sound produced by complete closure of the oral passage and subsequent release accompanied by a burst of air, as in the sound (p) in pit or (d) in dog.
n.
A plosive speech sound.

[From explosive.]

plosive

(ˈpləʊsɪv) phonetics
adj
(Phonetics & Phonology) articulated with or accompanied by plosion
n
(Phonetics & Phonology) a plosive consonant; stop
[C20: from French, from explosif explosive]

plo•sive

(ˈploʊ sɪv)
adj.
1. of or pertaining to a consonant characterized by momentary complete closure at some part of the vocal tract causing stoppage of the flow of air, followed by sudden release of the compressed air.
n.
2. a plosive consonant, as (p) or (d); stop.
[1895–1900; shortening of explosive]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.plosive - a consonant produced by stopping the flow of air at some point and suddenly releasing it; "his stop consonants are too aspirated"
obstruent - a consonant that is produced with a partial or complete blockage of the airflow from the lungs through the nose or mouth
implosion - the initial occluded phase of a stop consonant
plosion, explosion - the terminal forced release of pressure built up during the occlusive phase of a stop consonant
labial stop - a stop consonant that is produced with the lips
glottal catch, glottal plosive, glottal stop - a stop consonant articulated by releasing pressure at the glottis; as in the sudden onset of a vowel
suction stop, click - a stop consonant made by the suction of air into the mouth (as in Bantu)
Translations
explozivaokluziva
eksplozivzapornik
klusil

plosive

[ˈpləʊsɪv]
A. ADJexplosivo
B. Nexplosiva f

plosive

adjVerschluss-, explosiv; plosive soundVerschlusslaut m
nVerschlusslaut m, → Explosivlaut m, → Explosivum nt (spec)

plosive

[ˈpləʊsɪv] (Phonetics)
1. adjocclusivo/a
2. nocclusiva
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 1: Descriptive statistics for the NWS and BCW texts Concept NWS BCW Words (tokens) 97 95 Content words 54 53 Particles 43 42 Words (types) 60 72 Content words 40 51 Particles 20 21 Phonemes (tokens) 428 423 Phonemes (types) 22 24 Table 2: Expected pronunciation for voiced obstruent phonemes Concept /b/ /d/ /g/ NWS 19 14 3 Plosive [b, d, g] 3 5 1 Continuant [[beta], [?
Thus, the phonetic segments were distributed in the different positions of syllables and words: simple and complex onset in initial and medial positions, with plosive, fricative, nasal and liquid phonemes, in addition to coda in the medial and final positions.
They involve the alveolar plosive [t] and the alveolar nasal [n].
fragments brief as Sappho's tremble of tongue on the brink of ex/ (when the passage of sound is completely blocked a consonant is called) plosive tongue on the brink of ex/ {prefix--occurring only before vowels) odus orcize on the brink of ex/ (to strip or peel off (the skin) 1547) coriate The tall, blond, blue-eyed, white-skinned man is shooting
a) Alveolar trill /r/ substitution errors are found for this phoneme, which is changed to plosive bilabial sound /b/ or by voiced velar plosive /g/ when the phoneme appears in initial position both in the first and the second syllable.
As for the group of plosives, the quality of articulation of each individual plosive was statistically much better in the first graders than in the preschool children, p<0.
Factually, Priscian and Hrabanus are correct, as the combination of plosive and nasal can create a common syllable even in the middle of a word in classical verse, although the feature is highly uncommon and restricted to Greek loans (Procne/Procne, ichneumon/ichneumon etc.
Among the topics are nominative resumptive pronouns in Old and Middle English, the preoccupation with the abuse of truth in Richard the Redeless and Thomas Usk's Testament of Love, finding pragmatic common ground between Chaucer's Dreamer and Eagle in The House of Fame, the rise and fall of to the end that and to the effect that in English, the insertion and loss of the voiceless dental plosive [t] in Middle English, and mapping rhetorical strategies related to persuasion in Middle English religious prose.
In the phonetic literature, preaspiration is noted as being typologically rare, and when present, it is usually employed as a cover term for a variety of segmental configurations, including a spirant homorganic to a following oral plosive (e.
Its use of plosive b's and t's give the poem an appropriate percussive sound and its fondness for fresh adjective-noun combinations ("fractious tree," "blind torn beings," "vital bones," "lost ganglia") is typical of his kennings in most of the other poems in the volume.
Based on the data, the ISP consonant phonemes has totaling 19 units phonemes which consists of; seven plosive consonant phonemes /[MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]/ four nasal consonants /[MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]/, two affricate consonants /[MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]/, two fricative consonant phonemes /[MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]/, one vibrations consonant /[MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]/, and two a half vowel consonants /[MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]/.