plosive


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Related to plosive: plosive speech sound

plo·sive

 (plō′sĭv, -zĭv)
adj.
Of, relating to, or being a speech sound produced by complete closure of the oral passage and subsequent release accompanied by a burst of air, as in the sound (p) in pit or (d) in dog.
n.
A plosive speech sound.

[From explosive.]

plosive

(ˈpləʊsɪv) phonetics
adj
(Phonetics & Phonology) articulated with or accompanied by plosion
n
(Phonetics & Phonology) a plosive consonant; stop
[C20: from French, from explosif explosive]

plo•sive

(ˈploʊ sɪv)
adj.
1. of or pertaining to a consonant characterized by momentary complete closure at some part of the vocal tract causing stoppage of the flow of air, followed by sudden release of the compressed air.
n.
2. a plosive consonant, as (p) or (d); stop.
[1895–1900; shortening of explosive]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.plosive - a consonant produced by stopping the flow of air at some point and suddenly releasing it; "his stop consonants are too aspirated"
obstruent - a consonant that is produced with a partial or complete blockage of the airflow from the lungs through the nose or mouth
implosion - the initial occluded phase of a stop consonant
plosion, explosion - the terminal forced release of pressure built up during the occlusive phase of a stop consonant
labial stop - a stop consonant that is produced with the lips
glottal catch, glottal plosive, glottal stop - a stop consonant articulated by releasing pressure at the glottis; as in the sudden onset of a vowel
suction stop, click - a stop consonant made by the suction of air into the mouth (as in Bantu)
Translations
explozivaokluziva
eksplozivzapornik
klusil

plosive

[ˈpləʊsɪv]
A. ADJexplosivo
B. Nexplosiva f

plosive

adjVerschluss-, explosiv; plosive soundVerschlusslaut m
nVerschlusslaut m, → Explosivlaut m, → Explosivum nt (spec)

plosive

[ˈpləʊsɪv] (Phonetics)
1. adjocclusivo/a
2. nocclusiva
References in periodicals archive ?
Beginning and ending exercise patterns with a sibilant, fricative, or plosive produced positive results immediately.
Mark the Phonemes in His / Her Repertory Bilabial Labiodental Dental Alveolar Plosive p b t [??] Nasal m [??] n Trill B r Tap / Flap [??] r Fricative [phi] [beta] f v [theta] [??] s z [??] 3 Lateral Fricative [??] [??] Approximant [??] [??] Lateral Approximant l Bilabial Post Alveolar Retroflex Palatal Velar Uvular Plosive t [??] [??] k g q g Nasal [eta] [??] [??] N Trill [??] Tap / Flap [??] Fricative [??] x [??] [??] Lateral Fricative Approximant [??] j [??] Lateral Approximant [??] [lambda] L Bilabial Pharyngeal Glottal Plosive [??] 7 Nasal Trill Tap / Flap Fricative h [??] h h Lateral Fricative Approximant Lateral Approximant (*) In the table above the sounds/phonemes In green are the target sounds that the child is expected tc articulate.
Research has mostly investigated learners' awareness and pronunciation development of voiceless plosive consonants /p/, /t/, and /k/ with aspiration (e.g., in L2 English) or without it (e.g., in L2 Spanish).
It should be noted that each language has a distinct voicing characteristic, as well as the aspiration in certain plosive sounds [11,12].
herefore there may e some e plosive chanes on the horion.
He had learned his lines, practiced his accent (plosive P's and B's, nasal M's and N's, palatalized fricatives, tongue tap dancing on the roof of his mouth) and a ballet of hand gestures that, he was rehearsed, either signified a) haggling; b) how-should-I-know-do-I-look-like-a-Rothschild/Einstein/Marx; or c) there-could-be-a-moron-under-that-rock-too.
The German version expresses them through the voiceless plosive alveolar t in both lexemes in the first compound (Tropfenturme) and the thrice-occurring voiced velar plosive g in the third compound (Gurgelgeister).
fragments brief as Sappho's tremble of tongue on the brink of ex/ (when the passage of sound is completely blocked a consonant is called) plosive tongue on the brink of ex/ {prefix--occurring only before vowels) odus orcize on the brink of ex/ (to strip or peel off (the skin) 1547) coriate The tall, blond, blue-eyed, white-skinned man is shooting This tension between universal and contingent grammars (think of Saussure's langue/parole dialectics) offers only the possibility--not certainty--of expression (another loaded term), and only vis-a-vis the expropriation of a mother tongue.
a) Alveolar trill /r/ substitution errors are found for this phoneme, which is changed to plosive bilabial sound /b/ or by voiced velar plosive /g/ when the phoneme appears in initial position both in the first and the second syllable.
As for the group of plosives, the quality of articulation of each individual plosive was statistically much better in the first graders than in the preschool children, p<0.01.