pluck


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pluck

 (plŭk)
v. plucked, pluck·ing, plucks
v.tr.
1. To remove or detach by grasping and pulling abruptly with the fingers; pick: pluck a flower; pluck feathers from a chicken.
2. To pull out the hair or feathers of: pluck a chicken.
3. To remove abruptly or forcibly: plucked their child from school in midterm.
4. To give an abrupt pull to; tug at: pluck a sleeve.
5. Music To sound (the strings of an instrument) by pulling and releasing them with the fingers or a plectrum.
v.intr.
To give an abrupt pull; tug.
n.
1. The act or an instance of plucking.
2. Resourceful courage and daring in the face of difficulties; spirit.
3. The heart, liver, windpipe, and lungs of a slaughtered animal.

[Middle English plukken, from Old English pluccian, probably from Vulgar Latin *piluccāre, ultimately from Latin pilāre, from pilus, hair.]

pluck′er n.

pluck

(plʌk)
vb
1. (tr) to pull off (feathers, fruit, etc) from (a fowl, tree, etc)
2. (when: intr, foll by at) to pull or tug
3. (tr; foll by off, away, etc) archaic to pull (something) forcibly or violently (from something or someone)
4. (Music, other) (tr) to sound (the strings) of (a musical instrument) with the fingers, a plectrum, etc
5. (tr) another word for strip17
6. (tr) slang to fleece or swindle
n
7. courage, usually in the face of difficulties or hardship
8. a sudden pull or tug
9. (Cookery) the heart, liver, and lungs, esp of an animal used for food
[Old English pluccian, plyccan; related to German pflücken]
ˈplucker n

pluck

(plʌk)

v.t.
1. to pull off or out from the place of growth, as fruit, flowers, or feathers.
2. to grasp or grab: to pluck someone's sleeve.
3. to pull with sudden force or with a jerk.
4. to pull or detach by force (often fol. by away, off, or out).
5. to remove feathers or hair from by pulling: to pluck a chicken.
6. Slang. to rob; cheat.
7. to sound (the strings of a musical instrument) by pulling at them with the fingers or a plectrum.
v.i.
8. to pull or tug sharply (often fol. by at).
9. to snatch (often fol. by at).
n.
10. the act of plucking; a tug.
11. courage; resolution.
[before 1000; Middle English plukken (v.), Old English pluccian, c. Middle Low German plucken; akin to Dutch plukken, German pflücken]
pluck′er, n.

Pluck

 of shawmers: a company of shawm players—Bk. of St. Albans, 1486; (a shawm is a medieval stringed musical instrument).
Examples: shawmer, a player of the shawm, 1505; a flourish of shawms, 1641.

pluck


Past participle: plucked
Gerund: plucking

Imperative
pluck
pluck
Present
I pluck
you pluck
he/she/it plucks
we pluck
you pluck
they pluck
Preterite
I plucked
you plucked
he/she/it plucked
we plucked
you plucked
they plucked
Present Continuous
I am plucking
you are plucking
he/she/it is plucking
we are plucking
you are plucking
they are plucking
Present Perfect
I have plucked
you have plucked
he/she/it has plucked
we have plucked
you have plucked
they have plucked
Past Continuous
I was plucking
you were plucking
he/she/it was plucking
we were plucking
you were plucking
they were plucking
Past Perfect
I had plucked
you had plucked
he/she/it had plucked
we had plucked
you had plucked
they had plucked
Future
I will pluck
you will pluck
he/she/it will pluck
we will pluck
you will pluck
they will pluck
Future Perfect
I will have plucked
you will have plucked
he/she/it will have plucked
we will have plucked
you will have plucked
they will have plucked
Future Continuous
I will be plucking
you will be plucking
he/she/it will be plucking
we will be plucking
you will be plucking
they will be plucking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been plucking
you have been plucking
he/she/it has been plucking
we have been plucking
you have been plucking
they have been plucking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been plucking
you will have been plucking
he/she/it will have been plucking
we will have been plucking
you will have been plucking
they will have been plucking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been plucking
you had been plucking
he/she/it had been plucking
we had been plucking
you had been plucking
they had been plucking
Conditional
I would pluck
you would pluck
he/she/it would pluck
we would pluck
you would pluck
they would pluck
Past Conditional
I would have plucked
you would have plucked
he/she/it would have plucked
we would have plucked
you would have plucked
they would have plucked

pluck

To remove the feathers from poultry or a game bird.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pluck - the trait of showing courage and determination in spite of possible loss or injury
fearlessness - the trait of feeling no fear
2.pluck - the act of pulling and releasing a taut cord
pull, pulling - the act of pulling; applying force to move something toward or with you; "the pull up the hill had him breathing harder"; "his strenuous pulling strained his back"
Verb1.pluck - pull or pull out sharplypluck - pull or pull out sharply; "pluck the flowers off the bush"
draw, pull, force - cause to move by pulling; "draw a wagon"; "pull a sled"
draw off, draw away, pull off - remove by drawing or pulling; "She placed the tray down and drew off the cloth"; "draw away the cloth that is covering the cheese"
tweeze - pluck with tweezers; "tweeze facial hair"
2.pluck - sell something to or obtain something from by energetic and especially underhanded activity
steal - take without the owner's consent; "Someone stole my wallet on the train"; "This author stole entire paragraphs from my dissertation"
3.pluck - rip off; ask an unreasonable price
extort, gouge, wring, rack, squeeze - obtain by coercion or intimidation; "They extorted money from the executive by threatening to reveal his past to the company boss"; "They squeezed money from the owner of the business by threatening him"
cheat, rip off, chisel - deprive somebody of something by deceit; "The con-man beat me out of $50"; "This salesman ripped us off!"; "we were cheated by their clever-sounding scheme"; "They chiseled me out of my money"
4.pluck - pull lightly but sharply with a plucking motion; "he plucked the strings of his mandolin"
draw, pull, force - cause to move by pulling; "draw a wagon"; "pull a sled"
twang - pluck (strings of an instrument); "He twanged his bow"
5.pluck - strip of feathers; "pull a chicken"; "pluck the capon"
strip - remove the surface from; "strip wood"
6.pluck - look for and gather; "pick mushrooms"; "pick flowers"
gather, pull together, collect, garner - assemble or get together; "gather some stones"; "pull your thoughts together"
mushroom - pick or gather mushrooms; "We went mushrooming in the Fall"
berry - pick or gather berries; "We went berrying in the summer"

pluck

verb
1. pull out or off, pick, draw, collect, gather, harvest I plucked a lemon from the tree.
2. tug, catch, snatch, clutch, jerk, yank, tweak, pull at He plucked the cigarette from his mouth.
3. strum, pick, finger, twang, thrum, plunk Nell was plucking a harp.
noun
1. courage, nerve, heart, spirit, bottle (Brit. slang), resolution, determination, guts (informal), balls (taboo slang), grit, bravery, backbone, mettle, boldness, spunk (informal), intrepidity, hardihood, ballsiness (taboo slang) Cynics might sneer at him but you have to admire his pluck.

pluck

verb
To remove from a fixed position:
noun
Translations
يَسْتَجْمِعُ قِواهيَسْحَب، يَشُديَقْطُف الأزْهاريَنْتِف الرّيشيَنْتِفُ الشَّعْرَ من الحَواجِب
brnkatodvahaškubattahattrhat
hiveknipsemodplukke
kiskaistakyniänäppäillänykäistäsinnikkyys
megkopasztpengetbátorságbelsőségkiszakít
gripla, plokkahugrekkiplokkaplokka; hnippareyta
išrautinupeštinuskintipešiotisukaupti visą drąsą
drosmeizplūktnoplūktparautplūkt
ošklbať
almakçekmekcesaretkoparmaktellerini çekerek çalmak

pluck

[plʌk]
A. N
1. (= tug) → tirón m
2. (= courage) → valor m, ánimo m; (= guts) → agallas fpl
it takes pluck to do thathace falta mucho valor para hacer eso
he's got plenty of plucktiene muchas agallas
I didn't have the pluck to own upno tuve el valor para confesar
B. VT [+ fruit, flower] (liter) → arrancar; [+ bird] → desplumar; [+ guitar] → pulsar, puntear
to pluck one's eyebrowsdepilarse las cejas
the helicopter plucked him from the seael helicóptero lo recogió del mar
it's an idea I've just plucked out of the aires una idea que he tenido al vuelo
he was plucked from obscurity to star in the showfue rescatado del anonimato para protagonizar el espectáculo
C. VI to pluck attirar de, dar un tirón a
to pluck at sb's sleevetirar a algn de la manga
pluck off pluck out VT + ADVarrancar con los dedos, arrancar de un tirón
pluck up VT + ADV (= summon up) to pluck up (one's) couragearmarse de valor
to pluck up the courage to do stharmarse de valor para hacer algo

pluck

[ˈplʌk]
vt
[+ fruit] → cueillir
(= pull) → arracher
They were plucked from the icy river → On les arracha aux eaux glacées.
to be plucked to safety → être mis à l'abri
to pluck out of the air [+ idea, figure, date] → lancer au juger or au jugé
[+ guitar, harp, strings] → pincer
[+ bird] → plumer
to pluck one's eyebrows → s'épiler les sourcils
ncourage m, cran m
pluck up
vt sep
to pluck up courage → prendre son courage à deux mains
to pluck up the courage to do sth → trouver le courage de faire qch
I eventually plucked up enough courage to ask her for her number → J'ai fini par trouver assez de courage pour lui demander son numéro.
pluck at
vt fus [+ sleeve, loose thread] → tirer

pluck

n
(= courage)Schneid m (inf), → Mut m
(of animal)Innereien pl
vt
fruit, flowerpflücken; chickenrupfen; guitar, eyebrowszupfen; to pluck (at) somebody’s sleevejdn am Ärmel zupfen; he plucked a stray hair off his coater zupfte sich (dat)ein Haar vom Mantel; she was plucked from obscurity to become a film starsie wurde von einer Unbekannten zum Filmstar gemacht; his rescuers had plucked him from the jaws of deathseine Retter hatten ihn den Klauen des Todes entrissen; he was plucked to safetyer wurde in Sicherheit gebracht; to pluck something out of the airetw aus der Luft greifen; to pluck up (one’s) courageall seinen Mut zusammennehmen
(also pluck out) hair, featherauszupfen; if thy right eye offend thee pluck it out (Bibl) → wenn dir dein rechtes Auge zum Ärgernis wird, so reiß es aus
vi to pluck at somethingan etw (dat)(herum)zupfen

pluck

[plʌk]
1. n (courage) → coraggio, fegato
2. vt (fruit, flower) → cogliere (also pluck out) → strappare (Mus) (strings) → pizzicare; (guitar) → pizzicare le corde di (Culin) (bird) → spennare
to pluck one's eyebrows → depilarsi le sopracciglia
to pluck up (one's) courage → farsi coraggio, armarsi di coraggio
3. vi to pluck at sb's sleevetirare qn per la manica

pluck

(plak) verb
1. to pull. She plucked a grey hair from her head; He plucked at my sleeve.
2. to pull the feathers off (a chicken etc) before cooking it.
3. to pick (flowers etc).
4. to pull hairs out of (eyebrows) in order to improve their shape.
5. to pull and let go (the strings of a musical instrument).
noun
courage He showed a lot of pluck.
ˈplucky adjective
courageous. a plucky young fellow.
ˈpluckily adverb
ˈpluckiness noun
pluck up (the) courage/energy etc
to gather up one's courage etc (to do something). She plucked up (the) courage to ask a question.
References in classic literature ?
They dreamt that a girl all dressed in red had come to them and said: 'If you wish that your son should really become the Sun-Hero in deed and not only in name, let him go out into the world and search for the Tree of the Sun, and when he has found it, let him pluck a golden apple from it and bring it home.
The Queen consented with many tears, and the King at once bade his son set forth in search of the Tree of the Sun, from which he was to pluck a golden apple.
Do you really imagine, brave son of the earth, that you can pluck an apple so easily from the Tree of the Sun?
Designed to surprise you, Lord Frederick,' said Mr Pluck.
Sir Mulberry garnished this speech with a hoarse laugh, and terminated it with a pleasant oath regarding Mr Nickleby's limbs, whereat Messrs Pyke and Pluck laughed consumedly.
demanded Ralph from the bottom of the table, where he was supported by Messrs Pyke and Pluck.
The Sheriff was will to pluck a prodigal with the next man, and he was moreover glad to have a guest who promised to enliven the feast.
And in your garden the man must never pluck the last of your posies.
In a steeplechase it all depends on riding and on pluck," said the Englishman.
Pluck out my other eye, and give it to her, and her father will not beat her.
I will stay with you one night longer," said the Swallow, "but I cannot pluck out your eye.
Finding it so directly on the threshold of our narrative, which is now about to issue from that inauspicious portal, we could hardly do otherwise than pluck one of its flowers, and present it to the reader.