plumbeous

plumbeous

(ˈplʌmbɪəs)
adj
(Elements & Compounds) made of or relating to lead or resembling lead in colour
[C16: from Latin plumbeus leaden, from plumbum lead]
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
In May, Jon Grainger discovered and photographed a plumbeous vireo in Bolingbrook, a first state record.
The marsh crocodile, olive ridley and green marine turtles, endemic and threatened species of fish (such as the mahasheer) and schools of plumbeous dolphins are known to be found in areas around the Hingol River.
Frequent visitors to the saltlick during the day include two species of primates, red howler monkeys (Alouatta seniculus) and white-bellied spider monkeys (Ateles belzebuth), and several species of birds, including common piping guan (Pipile pipile), plumbeous pigeon (Columba plumbea), ruddy quail-dove (Geotrygon montana), speckled chachalaca (Ortalisguttata), mealy amazon (Amazona farinosa) and yellow-crowned amazon (Amazona ochrocephala).
Moreover, the legs are brownish, plumbeous or slaty-brown rather than flesh-coloured (Showler and Davidson, 1999).
If something is plumbeous, what metal's colour does it look like?
House finches and plumbeous vireos are two examples, Francis said.
Besides a large variety of marine fish, the plumbeous dolphin, the beaked dolphin or blue whale, and a variety of skates frequent the seas along the Sindh coast.
o find out which species will be most threatened by an increasingly noisy world and whether closely related species respond similarly to noise, Francis and his colleagues surveyed two closely related species with similar songs -the grey vireo and the plumbeous vireo - both living near natural gas extraction sites in the Bureau of Land Management's Rattlesnake Canyon Wildlife Area in northern New Mexico.
"Plumbeous vireos raised the pitch of the lowest part of their song, while grey vireos raised the pitch of the highest part of their song," said Francis.
(g) Includes black-throated gray warbler Setaphaga nigrescens), plumbeous vireo Vireo plumbeus), and warbling vireo Vireo gilvus).
We studied nesting behavior of the blue-gray gnatcatcher (Polioptila caerulea), plumbeous vireo (Vireo plumbeus), and western tanager (Piranga ludoviciana) in pinyon juniper (Pinus-Juniperus) woodlands in New Mexico.