plunging


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Related to plunging: Plunging fire, plunging fold

plunge

 (plŭnj)
v. plunged, plung·ing, plung·es
v.intr.
1.
a. To dive, jump, or throw oneself: We plunged into the lake.
b. To fall rapidly: The car went off the road and plunged into the gully.
2. To devote oneself to or undertake an activity earnestly or wholeheartedly: I plunged into my studies. She plunged ahead with her plan.
3. To enter or move headlong through something: The hunting dogs plunged into the forest.
4. To slope steeply downward: a cliff that plunges to the sea.
5. To move forward and downward violently: The ship plunged through rough seas.
6. To become suddenly lower; decrease dramatically: Stock prices plunged during the banking crisis.
v.tr.
1. To thrust or throw forcefully into a substance or place: plunged the eggs into the hot water; plunged the fork into the potato.
2. To cast suddenly, violently, or deeply into a given state or situation: "The street was plunged in cool shadow" (Richard Wright).
3. To use a plunger to try to unblock (a drain, for example).
n.
1. The act or an instance of plunging: a plunge off the dock.
2. A swim; a dip.
3. A sudden or dramatic decline: a plunge in prices.
Idiom:
take the plunge Informal
To begin an unfamiliar venture, especially after hesitating: After a three-year engagement, they're finally taking the plunge.

[Middle English plungen, from Old French plongier, from Vulgar Latin *plumbicāre, to heave a sounding lead, from Latin plumbum, lead.]

plunging

(ˈplʌndʒɪŋ)
adj
(of a neckline or dress) showing a lot of a woman's chest
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

plunging

adjective
Cut to reveal the wearer's neck, chest, and back:
Translations

plunging

[ˈplʌndʒɪŋ] ADJ plunging necklineescote m muy bajo

plunging

[ˈplʌndʒɪŋ] adj [neckline] → plongeant(e)

plunging

adj
neckline, backtief ausgeschnitten; her deeply plunging necklineder tiefe Ausschnitt ihres Kleides
(= decreasing) cost, currency, pricesstark fallend

plunging

[ˈplʌndʒɪŋ] adj (neckline) → profondo/a; (back of dress) → profondamente scollato/a
References in classic literature ?
Presently a great hole was torn in the hull of one of the immense battle craft from the Zodangan camp; with a lurch she turned completely over, the little figures of her crew plunging, turning and twisting toward the ground a thousand feet below; then with sickening velocity she tore after them, almost completely burying herself in the soft loam of the ancient sea bottom.
There was an extremely pathetic side to the surrender of these mighty fliers, the result of an age-old custom which demanded that surrender should be signalized by the voluntary plunging to earth of the commander of the vanquished vessel.
A trooper, braver than his fellows, leaped among the kicking, plunging, fear-maddened beasts in a futile attempt to quiet them.
The leaping carnivora and the plunging horses, prevented any concerted action by the Abyssinians--it was every man for himself--and in the melee, the defenseless woman was either forgotten or ignored by her black captors.
Moving briskly forward, and plunging and tossing through a succession of deep snow-drifts, they at length reached a valley known among trappers as the "Grand Rond," which they found entirely free from snow.
The snow was from two to three feet deep, but soft and yielding, so that the horses had no foothold, but kept plunging forward, straining themselves by perpetual efforts.
At length they reached the summit, where the snow was blown off; but in descending on the opposite side, they were often plunging through deep drifts, piled in the hollows and ravines.
How John passed the evening, in what windy confusion of mind, in what squalls of anger and lulls of sick collapse, in what pacing of streets and plunging into public-houses, it would profit little to relate.
That immense black obelisk thus isolated between the two white expanses of the sky and the river, which was very broad at this point, produced upon Dom Claude a singular effect, comparable to that which would be experienced by a man who, reclining on his back at the foot of the tower of Strasburg, should gaze at the enormous spire plunging into the shadows of the twilight above his head.
Now Tom, about this business of leasing to the English Government the right to manufac- ture that new explosive of yours," began Ned, plunging into the business at hand.
The railway track wound in and out among the passes, now approaching the mountain-sides, now suspended over precipices, avoiding abrupt angles by bold curves, plunging into narrow defiles, which seemed to have no outlet.
Obviously, it had a different meaning to me because it affects me directly," Giltner said after plunging into a hole of water cut from the sheet of ice covering both lakes.