plural marriage


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plural marriage

n.
Polygamy, especially as historically practiced in the Mormon religious tradition.
References in periodicals archive ?
* 1890 President Wilford Woodruff issues The Manifesto, ending the Mormon practice of plural marriage
At roughly 10,000 members, FLDS is the largest branch of Mormon fundamentalism; they are an apocalyptic sect who practice polygyny, or theologically justified plural marriage. In part, plural marriage is theologically significant to FLDS members because a multi-partner can marriage bring more spirit children into material existence than are possible with in a monogamous relationship, thus helping to expand the kingdom of God on earth and in heaven.
Thus, the high court refused to permit Mormons to engage in polygamy, even though church officials argued that plural marriage was part of their belief system.
The battles over marriage, including future debates over plural marriage, can indeed be defused if they are de-politicized.
This Article answers that question in a novel way by scrutinizing the practice of plural marriage through the lens of economic game theory, exploring the extreme harms that would befall the state should polygamy become law.
The grounds on which the Utah-based church (https://www.lds.org/new-era/1975/07/qa-questions-and-answers?lang=eng) excommunicates leaders include gross iniquity (involving transgressions such as murder, adultery, sexual perversion, and felony conviction) involving in or advocating plural marriage and apostatizing from the teachings of the Church.
A House Full of Females: Plural Marriage and Women's Rights in Early Mormonism, 1835-1870.
The two have heard rumors that some practitioners of their chosen religion are also practitioners of plural marriage and the two agree that they will not become involved in such an arrangement.
Alternative lifestyles such as swinging and plural marriage are examined, and the impact adultery scandals in political careers is discussed.
He notes that plural marriage could be a similarly natural familial evolution.
But despite living in a fundamentalist "plural marriage" colony in Mexico that had broken away from the Mormon church, most of them did not hope for a polygamous future as a "sister wife." They knew all too well what that meant.
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (also known as "Mormons") have asked us to clarify that the church bans plural marriage, and Church members practicing polygamy would lose their membership.