pluralism

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plu·ral·ism

 (plo͝or′ə-lĭz′əm)
n.
1. The condition of being multiple or plural.
2.
a. A condition in which numerous distinct ethnic, religious, or cultural groups are present and tolerated within a society.
b. The belief that such a condition is desirable or socially beneficial.
3. Ecclesiastical The holding by one person of two or more positions or offices, especially two or more ecclesiastical benefices, at the same time.
4. Philosophy
a. The doctrine that reality is composed of many ultimate substances.
b. The belief that no single explanatory system or view of reality can account for all the phenomena of life.

pluralism

(ˈplʊərəˌlɪzəm)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the holding by a single person of more than one ecclesiastical benefice or office
2. (Sociology) sociol a theory of society as several autonomous but interdependent groups which either share power or continuously compete for power
3. (Sociology) the existence in a society of groups having distinctive ethnic origin, cultural forms, religions, etc
4. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) a theory that views the power of employers as being balanced by the power of trade unions in industrial relations such that the interests of both sides can be catered for
5. (Philosophy) philosophy
a. the metaphysical doctrine that reality consists of more than two basic types of substance. Compare monism2, dualism2
b. the metaphysical doctrine that reality consists of independent entities rather than one unchanging whole. Compare monism2, absolutism2b
ˈpluralist n, adj
ˌpluralˈistic adj

plu•ral•ism

(ˈplʊər əˌlɪz əm)

n.
1. (in philosophy)
a. a theory that there is more than one basic substance or principle. Compare dualism (def. 2a), monism (def. 1a).
b. a theory that reality consists of two or more independent elements.
2.
a. a condition in which minority groups participate fully in the dominant society, yet maintain their cultural differences.
b. a doctrine that society benefits from such a condition.
3. the holding by one person of two or more church offices at the same time.
4. the state or quality of being plural.
[1810–20]
plu′ral•ist, n., adj.
plu`ral•is′tic, adj.
plu`ral•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.

pluralism

1. Ecclesiastic. the holding of two or more church offices by a single person.
2. the state or condition of a common civilization in which various ethnic, racial, or religious groups are free to participate in and develop their common cultures.
3. a policy or principle supporting such cultural plurality. — pluralist, n. — pluralistic, adj.
See also: Politics
1. a theory positing more than one principle or basic substance as the ground of reality. Cf. dualism, monism.
2. a theory that reality consists, not of an organic whole, but of two or more independent material or spiritual entities. — pluralist, n.pluralistic, adj.
See also: Philosophy

pluralism

1. The belief that there are more than one or two substances in the world, such as mind and matter.
2. A situation in which several different ethnic or cultural groups coexist within a society.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pluralism - a social organization in which diversity of racial or religious or ethnic or cultural groups is tolerated
social organisation, social organization, social structure, social system, structure - the people in a society considered as a system organized by a characteristic pattern of relationships; "the social organization of England and America is very different"; "sociologists have studied the changing structure of the family"
2.pluralism - the doctrine that reality consists of several basic substances or elements
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
monism - the doctrine that reality consists of a single basic substance or element
3.pluralism - the practice of one person holding more than one benefice at a time
practice, pattern - a customary way of operation or behavior; "it is their practice to give annual raises"; "they changed their dietary pattern"
Translations
pluralizam

pluralism

[ˈplʊərəlɪzəm] Npluralismo m

pluralism

[ˈplʊərəlɪzəm] npluralisme m

pluralism

nPluralismus m

pluralism

[ˈplʊərəˌlɪzm] npluralismo
References in classic literature ?
It is protest enough against the pluralism they want to reform if I give somebody else most of the money.
The range of 'pluralisms' is best encapsulated in what may be called paradigm pluralism.
This article examines avenues for resolving what appears to be an inherent tension in the fallibilist argument for pluralism in economics.
We are threatened with a not very illuminating plurality of pluralisms.
21 (1998); IHSAN YILMAZ, MUSLIM LAWS, POLITICS, AND SOCIETY IN MODERN NATION STATES: DYNAMIC LEGAL PLURALISMS IN ENGLAND, TURKEY AND PAKISTAN (2005).
Moreover, for those who fear that 'modest pluralisms are difficult to distinguish from a sophisticated form of monism' (xiii), stronger versions, which actually posit ineliminable pluralities, will seem the surest path to a substantial form of pluralism.
He argues that pluralism is best understood as a movement rather than a single unified approach.
He never intended his multifaceted analysis to be set up as the one and only, the pluralism to end all pluralisms.
A taxonomy of pluralisms, similar to Judith Andre's taxonomy of "blocked exchanges," might help readers understand the complexity of liberal societies that this concept highlights.
But, despite the rich role that pluralism plays in democratic politics and its usefulness as an analytic tool of democratic theory, the pluralist aspect of liberal politics is hardly explored at all.
The discourse of religious pluralism pervades the study of religious diversity as well as public conversations about the role of religion in the public sphere.
Before elaborating on the discourse of religious pluralism, I want to give attention to how I use the term "discourse" and the accompanying theoretical concepts and frameworks supporting my inquiry.