pluralism

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plu·ral·ism

 (plo͝or′ə-lĭz′əm)
n.
1. The condition of being multiple or plural.
2.
a. A condition in which numerous distinct ethnic, religious, or cultural groups are present and tolerated within a society.
b. The belief that such a condition is desirable or socially beneficial.
3. Ecclesiastical The holding by one person of two or more positions or offices, especially two or more ecclesiastical benefices, at the same time.
4. Philosophy
a. The doctrine that reality is composed of many ultimate substances.
b. The belief that no single explanatory system or view of reality can account for all the phenomena of life.

pluralism

(ˈplʊərəˌlɪzəm)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the holding by a single person of more than one ecclesiastical benefice or office
2. (Sociology) sociol a theory of society as several autonomous but interdependent groups which either share power or continuously compete for power
3. (Sociology) the existence in a society of groups having distinctive ethnic origin, cultural forms, religions, etc
4. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) a theory that views the power of employers as being balanced by the power of trade unions in industrial relations such that the interests of both sides can be catered for
5. (Philosophy) philosophy
a. the metaphysical doctrine that reality consists of more than two basic types of substance. Compare monism2, dualism2
b. the metaphysical doctrine that reality consists of independent entities rather than one unchanging whole. Compare monism2, absolutism2b
ˈpluralist n, adj
ˌpluralˈistic adj

plu•ral•ism

(ˈplʊər əˌlɪz əm)

n.
1. (in philosophy)
a. a theory that there is more than one basic substance or principle. Compare dualism (def. 2a), monism (def. 1a).
b. a theory that reality consists of two or more independent elements.
2.
a. a condition in which minority groups participate fully in the dominant society, yet maintain their cultural differences.
b. a doctrine that society benefits from such a condition.
3. the holding by one person of two or more church offices at the same time.
4. the state or quality of being plural.
[1810–20]
plu′ral•ist, n., adj.
plu`ral•is′tic, adj.
plu`ral•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.

pluralism

1. Ecclesiastic. the holding of two or more church offices by a single person.
2. the state or condition of a common civilization in which various ethnic, racial, or religious groups are free to participate in and develop their common cultures.
3. a policy or principle supporting such cultural plurality. — pluralist, n. — pluralistic, adj.
See also: Politics
1. a theory positing more than one principle or basic substance as the ground of reality. Cf. dualism, monism.
2. a theory that reality consists, not of an organic whole, but of two or more independent material or spiritual entities. — pluralist, n.pluralistic, adj.
See also: Philosophy

pluralism

1. The belief that there are more than one or two substances in the world, such as mind and matter.
2. A situation in which several different ethnic or cultural groups coexist within a society.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pluralism - a social organization in which diversity of racial or religious or ethnic or cultural groups is tolerated
social organisation, social organization, social structure, social system, structure - the people in a society considered as a system organized by a characteristic pattern of relationships; "the social organization of England and America is very different"; "sociologists have studied the changing structure of the family"
2.pluralism - the doctrine that reality consists of several basic substances or elements
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
monism - the doctrine that reality consists of a single basic substance or element
3.pluralism - the practice of one person holding more than one benefice at a time
practice, pattern - a customary way of operation or behavior; "it is their practice to give annual raises"; "they changed their dietary pattern"
Translations
pluralizam

pluralism

[ˈplʊərəlɪzəm] Npluralismo m

pluralism

[ˈplʊərəlɪzəm] npluralisme m

pluralism

nPluralismus m

pluralism

[ˈplʊərəˌlɪzm] npluralismo
References in classic literature ?
Thus, to take a long and circuitous route, after enticing the enemy out of the way, and though starting after him, to contrive to reach the goal before him, shows knowledge of the artifice of DEVIATION.
If you march fifty LI in order to outmaneuver the enemy, you will lose the leader of your first division, and only half your force will reach the goal.
Nay though these too should turn homeward with their ships, Sthenelus and myself will still fight on till we reach the goal of Ilius, for heaven was with us when we came.
He said further that he should advise every one to sail home likewise, for that you will not reach the goal of Ilius.
There have been few attempts to answer the twin challenges for alethic pluralists to maintain standard accounts of the logical operators and of logical consequence in a sufficiently systematic and precise way.
As with other Africana theologians and pluralists, King mastered using the sociocultural reality around himself.
Especially worthwhile are the detailed discussions of pluralists Montesquieu, Adam Smith (sort of), Benjamin Constant, Edmund Burke, James Madison, Alexis de Tocqueville (who famously celebrated Americans' love affair with associations), and Lord Acton; and rationalists Voltaire, Destutt de Tracy (whom Thomas Jefferson championed), Thomas Paine, and John Stuart Mill.
But this is a democratic stance whose basis is pretty weak because Muslims did not become democrats because they reviewed their own theological and jurisprudential sources; instead, they felt they had to be democrats and pluralists because of repression.
As an example of the ways in which each strand's "insights and blind spots" are "hard to pull apart," Levy points to some of the major policy disagreements between the rationalist Mill on the one side and the pluralists Tocqueville and Acton on the other.
Sometimes pluralists portray the issue as a struggle between liberals and conservatives.
For the last half-century there has been a concerted effort by religious pluralists to defend the truth of the assertion that adherents to the many and varied world religions all worship and participate in the same reality.
Indeed, legal pluralists have historically focused primarily on the descriptive, tracing the overlaps and tensions that occur when two or more legal or quasi-legal systems operate in the same social field.