plutonium


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to plutonium: plutonium 239

plu·to·ni·um

 (plo͞o-tō′nē-əm)
n. Symbol Pu
A radioactive, silvery, metallic transuranic element, occurring in uranium ores and produced artificially by neutron bombardment of uranium. Its longest-lived isotope is Pu-244 with a half-life of 80 million years. It is a radiological poison, specifically absorbed by bone marrow, and is used, especially the highly fissionable isotope Pu-239, as a reactor fuel and in nuclear weapons. Atomic number 94; melting point 640°C; boiling point 3,228°C; specific gravity 19.84 (25°C); valence 3, 4, 5, 6. See Periodic Table.

[After the dwarf planet Pluto (from the fact that it follows neptunium in the periodic table).]

plutonium

(pluːˈtəʊnɪəm)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a highly toxic metallic transuranic element. It occurs in trace amounts in uranium ores and is produced in a nuclear reactor by neutron bombardment of uranium-238. The most stable and important isotope, plutonium-239, readily undergoes fission and is used as a reactor fuel in nuclear power stations and in nuclear weapons. Symbol: Pu; atomic no: 94; half-life of 239Pu: 24 360 years; valency: 3, 4, 5, or 6; relative density (alpha modification): 19.84; melting pt: 640°C; boiling pt: 3230°C
[C20: named after the dwarf planet Pluto because Pluto lies beyond Neptune and plutonium was discovered soon after neptunium]

plu•to•ni•um

(pluˈtoʊ ni əm)

n.
a radioactive metallic transuranic element with a fissile isotope of mass number 239 that can be produced from nonfissile uranium 238. Symbol: Pu; at. no.: 94.
[1940–45; < Greek Ploútōn Pluto + -ium2]

plu·to·ni·um

(plo͞o-tō′nē-əm)
Symbol Pu A silvery, radioactive metallic element of the actinide series that has the highest atomic number of all naturally occurring elements. It can be found in minute amounts in uranium ores and is produced artificially by bombarding uranium with neutrons. It is absorbed by bone marrow and is highly poisonous. Plutonium is used in nuclear weapons and as a fuel in nuclear reactors. Its most stable isotope has a half-life of 76 million years. Atomic number 94. See Periodic Table.

plutonium

Element produced in large quantities by nuclear reactors; also used in nuclear weapons.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.plutonium - a solid silvery grey radioactive transuranic element whose atoms can be split when bombarded with neutronsplutonium - a solid silvery grey radioactive transuranic element whose atoms can be split when bombarded with neutrons; found in minute quantities in uranium ores but is usually synthesized in nuclear reactors; 13 isotopes are known with the most important being plutonium 239
chemical element, element - any of the more than 100 known substances (of which 92 occur naturally) that cannot be separated into simpler substances and that singly or in combination constitute all matter
plutonium 239 - a highly fissionable isotope of plutonium that is used in atomic weapons and as a reactor fuel; produced by irradiating uranium 238 with slow electrons
Translations
عُنْصُر إشْعاعي
плутоний
plutonium
plutonium
plutonio
plutoonium
plutonium
plutonij
plutónium
plútonplútóníum
プルトニウム
plutonium
plutonis
plutonijs
plutoniu
plutoniumplutónium
plutonij
plutonium
plütonyum
plutoni

plutonium

[pluːˈtəʊnɪəm] Nplutonio m

plutonium

[pluːˈtəʊniəm] nplutonium m

plutonium

nPlutonium nt

plutonium

[pluːˈtəʊnɪəm] nplutonio

plutonium

(pluːˈtəuniəm) noun
a radioactive element used in many nuclear processes.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 2003, Sellafield, which reprocesses spent fuel and employs more than 10,000 workers, revealed that there was 19kg of plutonium unaccounted for.
If the plutonium has been stolen, there would be enough to make four nuclear weapons.
The cargo of 125 kilograms of plutonium is heading for France from the US, to be converted into nuclear reactor fuel rods.
Sellafield - less than 80 miles from Ireland's east coast - is Britain's main source of plutonium and now poses an even greater risk to us.
Kim Jong-il may have nuclear weapons now; he certainly has enough plutonium to build some, and the reactors to breed more.
Many community members and environmental organizations--while happy to see the 6,400-acre site out of commission--are concerned that the project is being done in haste and find it unsettling that plutonium residue and toxins will be left several feet under the surface.
WISE-Paris points out that serious accidents, such as a rail accident in a tunnel involving a convoy carrying irradiated fuel and another transporting oil and gas, an accident involving a lorry carrying plutonium oxide powder or even a malicious act against such a lorry could lead to major contamination problems.
The United States has identified two competing options for the plutonium cycle.
The DT-22 is a 45-gallon container that cannot be certified for plutonium shipments because it fails the government's "crush test," and could rupture in a highway accident.
Much of the air, water, and soil around the Mayak complex contains radioactive isotopes from the plutonium reprocessing that still goes on there.
Dr Hamish Banford, head of decommissioning at the Scottish Universities Research and Reactor Centre at East Kilbride, said there is a risk of Plutonium 241 entering the food chain.
The secret tests involve plutonium 242, and 100 kilograms is enough to cause criticality triggering an explosion, while testing with less than 100 kg maintains a pre-critical condition, the group said.