pneumothorax


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Related to pneumothorax: Tension pneumothorax

pneu·mo·tho·rax

 (no͞o′mō-thôr′ăks′, nyo͞o′-)
n.
Accumulation of air or gas in the pleural cavity, occurring as a result of disease or injury, or sometimes induced to collapse the lung in the treatment of tuberculosis and other lung diseases.

pneumothorax

(ˌnjuːməʊˈθɔːræks)
n
1. (Pathology) the abnormal presence of air between the lung and the wall of the chest (pleural cavity), resulting in collapse of the lung
2. (Medicine) med the introduction of air into the pleural cavity to collapse the lung: a former treatment for tuberculosis

pneu•mo•tho•rax

(ˌnu məˈθɔr æks, -ˈθoʊr-, ˌnyu-)

n.
the presence of air or gas in the pleural cavity.
[1815–25]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pneumothorax - abnormal presence of air in the pleural cavity resulting in the collapse of the lung; may be spontaneous (due to injury to the chest) or induced (as a treatment for tuberculosis)
abnormalcy, abnormality - an abnormal physical condition resulting from defective genes or developmental deficiencies
Translations

pneumothorax

[ˌnjuːməʊˈθɔːræks] npneumotorace m

pneu·mo·thor·ax

n. neumotórax, acumulación de aire o gas en la cavidad pleural que resulta en colapso del pulmón afectado;
spontaneous ______ espontáneo;
tension ______ por tensión.

pneumothorax

n neumotórax m
References in periodicals archive ?
Pneumothorax causes the air that should fill the lungs to reach the area between the lung and chest wall.
Upper and lower BLUE points were examined in supine position to facilitate the detection of pneumothorax, and PLAPS point was examined in semirecumbent position to diagnose and precisely quantify minimal pleural effusion.
Postoperative complications, length of hospital stay and incidence of pneumothorax recurrence during one-year follow up were also recorded.
[4] Thoracic endometriosis syndrome refers to the clinical manifestations of the cyclical changes associated with the ectopic endometrial tissue, most frequently catamenial (menstrual) pneumothorax, followed by catamenial haemothorax, catamenial haemoptysis and endometriotic pulmonary nodules, in descending order of frequency.
In the chest X-ray, there was pneumothorax on the left and in the right axillary region, a foreign body formation with metallic density at approximately the 5th-6th ICA level (Figure 3a, 3b).
Patients who had secondary spontaneous pneumothorax and traumatic and iatrogenic pneumothorax; <18 years old; treated conservatively or with awake non-intubated procedures; and with missing data were excluded from our study.
The authors sought to determine the incidence of pneumothorax and catheter misplacement after ultrasound-guided CVC insertion.
From the mediastinum, air migrates along fascial planes into the subcutaneous and retroperitoneal tissues.1 It is now accepted that pneumothorax may coexist when air tracks between visceral and parietal pleura1 although isolated tension pneumothorax may exist as a separate entity.
Chest X-ray revealed a unilateral right sided pneumothorax with no mediastinal change (Figure 1).
No convulsion, local anesthetic drug toxicity, or pneumothorax was associated with inadvertent intravascular injection in either group.