pockmarked


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pock·mark

 (pŏk′märk′)
n.
1. A pitlike scar left on the skin by smallpox or another eruptive disease.
2. A small pit on a surface: The gophers left the lawn covered with pockmarks.
tr.v. pock·marked, pock·mark·ing, pock·marks
To cover with pockmarks; pit.

pock′marked′ adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

pockmarked

(ˈpɒkˌmɑːkd)
adj
(Pathology) abounding in pockmarks
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.pockmarked - used of paved surfaces having holes or pits
rough, unsmooth - having or caused by an irregular surface; "trees with rough bark"; "rough ground"; "rough skin"; "rough blankets"; "his unsmooth face"
2.pockmarked - marked by or as if by smallpox or acne or other eruptive skin disease
blemished - marred by imperfections
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

pockmarked

adjective scarred, spotted, pitted, blemished, pocked He had a pockmarked face.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
مَجْدور، مُجَدَّر
poďobaný
koparret
himlõhelyesragyás
meî bóluör
poďobaný
çiçek bozuğuçopur

pockmarked

[ˈpɒkmɑːkt] ADJ [face] → picado de viruelas; [surface] → marcado de hoyos
to be pockmarked withestar marcado or acribillado de
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

pockmarked

[ˈpɒkmɑːrkt] adj [face] → grêlé(e); [surface, wall] → criblé(e) de petits trous
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

pockmarked

[ˈpɒkˌmɑːkt] adj (face) → butterato/a; (surface) → bucherellato/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

pockmark

(ˈpokmaːk) noun
a scar or small dent in the skin caused by smallpox etc.
ˈpockmarked adjective
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
The last of the Horse Guards, a huge pockmarked fellow, frowned angrily on seeing Rostov before him, with whom he would inevitably collide.
"It's I," said a firm, pleasant, woman's voice, and the stern, pockmarked face of Matrona Philimonovna, the nurse, was thrust in at the doorway.
The maid who opened it was short, dark, and slightly pockmarked. For the rest, an obvious "femme-de-chambre," and very busy.
Its precipitous walls are pockmarked by great scooped hollows, gouged over centuries by stones and gravel driven by furious waters.
Britain is now a scruffy nation: our highways, byways and alleyways awash with discarded rubbish; our roads pockmarked with potholes; the nation's movers, shakers and entertainers unable to make us think or laugh without recourse to obscenity, or as our broadcasters put it, "strong language and adult humour"; and on and on...
Photographs shared on social media showed houses pockmarked with bullet holes, and an online video showed shots being fired from a military vehicle.
He was described as white, in his early 30s, 6ft, slim, with a long nose and pockmarked skin.
Although most of our shelters on main highways are in a reasonable condition, some have been vandalised with the panels removed; some are dirty and have been pockmarked with scratch marks and unsightly graffiti.
The appalling condition of surfaces in the region, with many pockmarked with potholes, has sparked fury from drivers.
A picture accompanying the Al Arabiya TV report appeared to show the outside of a civilian home pockmarked by shrapnel.
One "huge square" hole opened up across the carriageway, while the rest of the road is pockmarked with potholes after sub-zero temperatures and a deluge snow.
The timing of deglacial and eustatic sequences proposed in the preceding model of development is supported by the widespread occurrence of pockmarked fields in areas at depths shallower than -40 m.