poetaster


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po·et·as·ter

 (pō′ĭt-ăs′tər)
n.
A writer of insignificant, meretricious, or shoddy poetry.

[New Latin poētaster : Latin poēta, poet; see poet + Latin -aster, pejorative suff.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

poetaster

(ˌpəʊɪˈtæstə; -ˈteɪ-)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a writer of inferior verse
[C16: from Medieval Latin; see poet, -aster]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

po•et•as•ter

(ˈpoʊ ɪtˌæs tər)

n.
an inferior poet; a writer of indifferent verse.
[1590–1600; < Medieval Latin or New Latin; see poet, -aster1]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

poetaster

noun
One who writes poetry:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

poetaster

[ˌpəʊɪˈtæstəʳ] Npoetastro m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

poetaster

n (pej)Poetaster m, → Dichterling m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
This is an example of a class of writing which may be passed over too lightly by those whom poetasters have made distrustful of poetry.
I have myself added to the tendency to view the play as a Marstonian creation, even though I do not consider the play to be a late work; I argued that the comic underplot involving the efforts of two Venetian gentlemen to cuckold one another reflects the rivalry between Marston and Jonson that climaxed in Satiromastix and Poetaster. (7)
As far as affixes are concerned, Jonson's use of the Latin suffix -aster in grammaticaster and poetaster is noteworthy.
Here, Jacobson highlights two scenes of purgation in Poetaster: the banishment of Ovid (the character) and the moment when the "eponymous poetaster" Crispinus is "forced to vomit his neologisms" (41).
I bar confusion / 'Tis I must make conclusion" (As You Like It, 5.4.114-15): it cannot be chance that when James did grace the Sidney circle at Wilton, the welcome Shakespeare inserted into As You Like It was another masque of Hymen, composed as what sounds like a parody of the regal poetaster's.
The extraordinary beauty of The Mastersingers has been overshadowed, however--really from its first performances--by Wagner's characterization of Beckmesser, a poetaster and scoundrel whom many have seen as an anti-Semitic caricature, and by Hans Sachs's stirring public exhortation to revere "Holy German Art," which has more recently acquired the taint of monstrous German chauvinism.
In his poetry volume Tender Moments, Osundare also relies largely on the use of alliteration for phonaesthetic and semantic purposes: "You / are the reason / the river flows in its bed / the mountain walks without stubbing a toe" (5); "You are a song so sweet in its tempting distance / my ears yearn for the magic of your softness" (15); "Swagger like a soldier / Prattle like a poetaster" (32); "Hairless heads impaled on pin necks / and ribs baring the benevolence / of the body politic" (Songs of the Marketplace 7); "Whose hippo hands slap the drum / Like a slab of flabby flesh" (Village Voices 5); "The moon, the moon is the lymph of the lore / the tail of the tribe, the AMEN of absent / prayers ..." (Moonsongs 25), or "the clown/in every crown/...
Contemporary allusions to country players tend to be derogative, characterising them as comically unsophisticated, or as crudely simple, as in Ben Jonson's Poetaster, where Tucca describes the strolling country player as one who stalks "vpon boords and / barrel heads to an old crackt trumpet" (3.4.169); but the example of the Simpsons suggests that we should not be in a hurry to assume that country-players' performances were crude, or that they were as theatrically naive as Shakespeare's artisans-turned-players in the Dream.
Jonson's Poetaster (1601; printed 1602) comments on masques in a similar way.