poetaster

(redirected from poetasters)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

po·et·as·ter

 (pō′ĭt-ăs′tər)
n.
A writer of insignificant, meretricious, or shoddy poetry.

[New Latin poētaster : Latin poēta, poet; see poet + Latin -aster, pejorative suff.]

poetaster

(ˌpəʊɪˈtæstə; -ˈteɪ-)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a writer of inferior verse
[C16: from Medieval Latin; see poet, -aster]

po•et•as•ter

(ˈpoʊ ɪtˌæs tər)

n.
an inferior poet; a writer of indifferent verse.
[1590–1600; < Medieval Latin or New Latin; see poet, -aster1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

poetaster

noun
One who writes poetry:
Translations

poetaster

[ˌpəʊɪˈtæstəʳ] Npoetastro m

poetaster

n (pej)Poetaster m, → Dichterling m
References in classic literature ?
This is an example of a class of writing which may be passed over too lightly by those whom poetasters have made distrustful of poetry.
It is rewriting season again, that season when poetasters rewrite history in the service of devious cabals, those who connive with demons to cause catastrophe and then lead the men and women mourning their fate.
Consequently, they often tend to either adopt the indiscriminate perspective of a catalogue or the partisanship of a self-promoting coterie of poetasters. Likewise, they also claim to renounce all forms of historiographical abstraction and forgo even attempting to provide new directions or spatial coordinates for their readers.
Penniman, The War of the Theatres (Boston, Halle, 1897), 154-5; Roscoe Addison Small, The Stage-Quarrel between Ben Jonson and the So-Called Poetasters (Breslau, 1899), 201-4; R.
Let's celebrate Zamurad as a tactile poetic presence and not allow the poetasters to trip over him.
John Neilson, mentioned above, published James Maxwell's Animad-versions on Some Poets and Poetasters of the Present Age and Ebenezer Picken's Poems and Epistles, Mostly in the Scottish Dialect (both 1788), with their attacks on Burns, before going on to print the Paisley edition of the famous Poems, Chiefly in the Scottish Dialect by the Bard himself in 1801-02.
Washington Post Poetry Editor Elizabeth Lund pushes rich and famous poetasters, court jesters of the academic/literary establishment.
Hazara People International Network and Hazara Democratic Party in Pakistan have asked Hazara poetasters around the world to sign this letter and send it to Minister of Foreign affairs, where the protests take place.
(37.) Fleay, Biographical Chronicle, and A Chronicle History; Penniman, The War of the Theatres (Boston: Ginn, 1897); and Small, The Stage-Quarrel Between Ben Jonson and the So-Called Poetasters (Breslau: M.
Although with Leavis he happily discards the Victorian poetasters, he will not have such as Burns cast out; it is, after all, a matter of personal integrity.
A wise exception is Stephen Adams Day, who writes, Though Stephen is not quite so arrogant as to say to himself, "I think I'll write a villanelle this morning," he virtually says so, and this fact shows that he is thinking in cliches, for the villanelle, though an ancient and beautiful French form, had had a great vogue among the precious poetasters of the naughty nineties in England, and by the time A Portrait appeared had already become as wearily conventional and thoroughly exhausted as the Petrarchan sonnet had become by the death of Queen Elizabeth.