poetics


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po·et·ics

 (pō-ĕt′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. or pl. verb)
1. Literary criticism that deals with the nature, forms, and laws of poetry.
2. A treatise on or study of poetry or aesthetics.
3. The practice of writing poetry; poetic composition.

poetics

(pəʊˈɛtɪks)
n (usually functioning as singular)
1. (Poetry) the principles and forms of poetry or the study of these, esp as a form of literary criticism
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a treatise on poetry

po•et•ics

(poʊˈɛt ɪks)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
1. literary criticism treating of the nature and laws of poetry.
2. the study of prosody.
3. a treatise on poetry.
[1720–30]

poetics

1. Lit. Crit. the nature and laws of poetry.
2. the study of prosody.
3. a treatise on poetry.
4. (cap.) a treatise or collection of lecture notes on aesthetics composed by Aristotle.
See also: Verse
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.poetics - study of poetic works
literary study - the humanistic study of literature
metrics, prosody - the study of poetic meter and the art of versification
Translations

poetics

[pəʊˈetɪks] NSINGpoética f

poetics

n singPoetik f
References in classic literature ?
In the collected edition the poems are printed with the dates, so far as can be ascertained, in the order of their composition--an arrangement which has indisputable recommendations for the student of Wordsworth's genius; though the former method of distributing his work into large groups of subject had its value, as throwing light upon his poetic motives, and more especially as coming from himself.
Morley has dwelt strongly on the circumstance of Wordsworth's remarkable personal happiness, as having had much to do with the physiognomy of his poetic creation--a calm, irresistible, well-being--almost mystic in character, and yet doubtless [93] connected with physical conditions.
For there is no common term we could apply to the mimes of Sophron and Xenarchus and the Socratic dialogues on the one hand; and, on the other, to poetic imitations in iambic, elegiac, or any similar metre.
IN speaking of the Poetic Principle, I have no design to be either thorough or profound.
We have taken it into our heads that to write a poem simply for the poem's sake, and to acknowledge such to have been our design, would be to confess ourselves radically wanting in the true poetic dignity and force:--but the simple fact is that would we but permit ourselves to look into our own souls we should immediately there discover that under the sun there neither exists nor can exist any work more thoroughly dignified, more supremely noble, than this very poem, this poem per se, this poem which is a poem and nothing more, this poem written solely for the poem's sake.
Such a poetry could not be permanently successful, because the subjects of which it treats -- if susceptible of poetic treatment at all -- were certainly not suited for epic treatment, where unity of action which will sustain interest, and to which each part should contribute, is absolutely necessary.
On the left of his great leader sat the poetic Snodgrass, and near him again the sporting Winkle; the former poetically enveloped in a mysterious blue cloak with a canine-skin collar, and the latter communicating additional lustre to a new green shooting-coat, plaid neckerchief, and closely-fitted drabs.
Poetic fame was dear to the heart of his friend Snodgrass; the fame of conquest was equally dear to his friend Tupman; and the desire of earning fame in the sports of the field, the air, and the water was uppermost in the breast of his friend Winkle.
For the ultimate force in the universe of these fighters and their poets (in spite of certain Christian touches inserted by later poetic editors before the poem crystallized into its present form) is Wyrd, the Fate of the Germanic peoples, cold as their own winters and the bleak northern sea, irresistible, despotic, and unmoved by sympathy for man.
But the barbaric vividness and power of the poem give it much more than a merely historical interest; and the careful reader cannot fail to realize that it is after all the product of a long period of poetic development.
I concentrated my thoughts on Venice; I stimulated my imagination with poetic memories, and strove to feel myself present in Venice, as I had felt myself present in Prague.
Something in him had suddenly changed; there was no longer the former poetic and mystic charm of desire, but there was pity for her feminine and childish weakness, fear at her devotion and trustfulness, and an oppressive yet joyful sense of the duty that now bound him to her forever.