poignant


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poign·ant

 (poin′yənt)
adj.
1.
a. Arousing deep emotion, especially pity or sorrow; touching: a poignant memory; a poignant story. See Synonyms at moving.
b. Keenly distressing to the mind or feelings: poignant anxiety.
c. Physically painful: "Keen, poignant agonies seemed to shoot from his neck downward" (Ambrose Bierce).
2. Piercing; incisive: poignant criticism.
3. Agreeably intense or stimulating: "It was a poignant delight to breathe the keen air" (Joseph A. Altsheler).
4. Archaic
a. Sharp or sour to the taste; piquant.
b. Sharp or pungent to the smell.

[Middle English poinaunt, from Old French poignant, present participle of poindre, to prick, from Latin pungere; see peuk- in Indo-European roots.]

poign′ance, poign′an·cy n.
poign′ant·ly adv.

poignant

(ˈpɔɪnjənt; -nənt)
adj
1. sharply distressing or painful to the feelings
2. to the point; cutting or piercing: poignant wit.
3. keen or pertinent in mental appeal: a poignant subject.
4. pungent in smell
[C14: from Old French, from Latin pungens pricking, from pungere to sting, pierce, grieve]
ˈpoignancy, ˈpoignance n
ˈpoignantly adv

poign•ant

(ˈpɔɪn yənt, ˈpɔɪ nənt)

adj.
1. keenly distressing to the feelings.
2. affecting the emotions: a poignant scene.
3. keen or strong in appeal; sharp; pointed: a subject of poignant interest.
4. pungent.
[1350–1400; Middle English poynaunt < Middle French poignant, present participle of poindre < Latin pungere to prick, pierce]
poign′an•cy, n.
poign′ant•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.poignant - arousing affectpoignant - arousing affect; "the homecoming of the released hostages was an affecting scene"; "poignant grief cannot endure forever"; "his gratitude was simple and touching"
moving - arousing or capable of arousing deep emotion; "she laid her case of destitution before him in a very moving letter"- N. Hawthorne
2.poignant - keenly distressing to the mind or feelings; "poignant anxiety"
painful - causing physical or psychological pain; "worked with painful slowness"

poignant

poignant

adjective
1. Exciting a deep, usually somber response:
2. Archaic. Affecting the organs of taste or smell with a strong and often harsh sensation:
Translations
kärkeväkirpeäpikanttipistävä
痛烈な辛辣な鋭い

poignant

[ˈpɔɪnjənt] ADJconmovedor, patético

poignant

[ˈpɔɪnjənt] adj (= very touching) → poignant(e)

poignant

adjergreifend; memories, lookwehmütig; distress, regretschmerzlich

poignant

[ˈpɔɪnjənt] adjcommovente, toccante
References in classic literature ?
With the stoicism of the green Martian he showed no sign of suffering, yet I knew that his grief was as poignant as my own.
That might very easily be, for there is seldom anything more poignant in any one of them than there is in the average course of things.
With feelings so poignant as mine, the conviction of having divided the son from his parents would make me, even with you, the most miserable of beings.
Everything she looked at, everything she remembered or thought of, became laden with poignant memory.
But then, you see, I had firmly realised this, that she would sooner recover from our separation than from our marriage; that her love for me, pretty and poignant and dramatic while it lasted, was a book- born, book-fed dream, which must die soon or late,--the sooner the better for the peace of the dreams that in the course of nature would soon spring up to take its place.
Vainly I had sought some method of manifestation, some way to make my continued existence and my great love and poignant pity understood by my husband and son.
Scarce an hour passed that did not bring its recollection of Korak, and its poignant yearning to see him again.
Mademoiselle had glided from the Chopin into the quivering lovenotes of Isolde's song, and back again to the Impromptu with its soulful and poignant longing.
The youth and cheerfulness of morning are in happy analogy, and of powerful operation; and if the distress be not poignant enough to keep the eyes unclosed, they will be sure to open to sensations of softened pain and brighter hope.
This was to be a poignant retaliation upon the officer who had said "mule drivers," and later "mud diggers," for in all the wild graspings of his mind for a unit responsible for his sufferings and commo- tions he always seized upon the man who had dubbed him wrongly.
The feelings of Sophia were at that time so exquisite, and the tenderness she felt for Augustus so poignant that I had not power to start any other topic, justly fearing that it might in some unforseen manner again awaken all her sensibility by directing her thoughts to her Husband.
At the moment when the thought of her isolation thus appeared to her more poignant than ever, she felt a bearded and hairy head glide between her hands, upon her knees.