pointillism

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poin·til·lism

 (pwăn′tə-lĭz′əm, point′l-ĭz′əm)
n.
A postimpressionist school of painting exemplified by Georges Seurat and his followers in late 19th-century France, characterized by the application of paint in small dots and brush strokes.

[French pointillisme, from pointiller, to paint small dots, stipple, from Old French *pointille, engraved with small dots, from point, point, from Latin pūnctum, from neuter past participle of pungere, to prick; see peuk- in Indo-European roots.]

poin′til·list adj. & n.
poin′til·lis′tic adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

pointillism

(ˈpwæntɪˌlɪzəm; -tiːˌɪzəm; ˈpɔɪn-)
n
(Art Terms) the technique of painting elaborated from impressionism, in which dots of unmixed colour are juxtaposed on a white ground so that from a distance they fuse in the viewer's eye into appropriate intermediate tones. Also called: divisionism
[C19: from French, from pointiller to mark with tiny dots, from pointille little point, from Italian puntiglio, from punto point]
ˈpointillist n, adj
ˈpointiˌlliste adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

poin•til•lism

(ˈpwæn tlˌɪz əm, -tiˌɪz-, ˈpɔɪn tlˌɪz-)

n. (sometimes cap.)
a theory and technique developed by the neo-impressionists, based on the principle that juxtaposed dots of pure color, as blue and yellow, are optically mixed into the resulting hue, as green, by the viewer.
[1900–05; < French pointillisme=pointill(er) to mark with points + -isme -ism]
poin′til•list, n., adj.
poin`til•list′ic, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Pointillism

a style of the late 19th century based upon some Impressionist techniques and the application of scientific theories of the process of vision; begun by Seurat, who gave it the name Divisionism, it consists of using dots of unmixed color side by side so that the viewer’s eye may mix them into the appropriate intermediate color. Also called Neo-Impressionism.Pointillist, n.Pointillistic, adj.
See also: Art
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

pointillism

(or divisionism)(c. 1880–1915) Based on the color theories of Chevreul, its aim was to achieve greater pictorial luminosity by placing small marks of pure primary color on the surface, allowing them to merge at a viewing distance to create an optical mixture.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pointillism - a school of painters who used a technique of painting with tiny dots of pure colors that would blend in the viewer's eye; developed by Georges Seurat and his followers late in 19th century France
school - a body of creative artists or writers or thinkers linked by a similar style or by similar teachers; "the Venetian school of painting"
art movement, artistic movement - a group of artists who agree on general principles
2.pointillism - a genre of painting characterized by the application of paint in dots and small strokes; developed by Georges Seurat and his followers in late 19th century France
genre - a class of art (or artistic endeavor) having a characteristic form or technique
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

pointillism

[ˈpwæntɪlɪzəm] Npuntillismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

pointillism

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
A passion for horticulture has always been evident in the designs of Christian Dior, from the French house's first collection in 1947--titled "Corolle," a reference to a flower's petals--to Raf Simons's latest floral-infused collection unveiled at the Musee Rodin's pointilist greenhouse.
To take as the ansatzpunkt of a world literature course not the making of the list but rather the question of how to read the items on the list is to seek a more pointilist vision of knowledge, a vision of world literature not as something we get or give, inherit or overthrow, but rather a way we learn to think.
It is clear that it is logically possible to arrange these red, yellow, and green points on the normative plane in a variety of interesting ways, ranging from something like an exercise in pointilist painting to drawings in a cell biology textbook.