polar zones

Related to polar zones: Temperate zones

polar zones

The regions that lie 75 –90° north and south of the equator.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
References in periodicals archive ?
"The tropics get hotter, the temperate zones get more like the tropics and the polar zones get more like the temperate zones," she added.
This is important because of long periods of nighttime conditions lasting for several months over the polar zones. Selection of bands on new-generation GEO imagers could be augmented with minor implications for the cost and technology to reflect the uniqueness of the polar environment, such as a need for better snow/ice, fog, and haze retrievals.
Meanwhile, Franco-German net Arte will also be present at Les Arcs with the interactive series "Polar Sea 360," featuring people living in polar zones endangered by global warming.
The marine and polar zones are mechanically cooled year-round by the heat pumps for cooling purposes and dehumidification.
In particular, the researchers detected far higher levels of carbon in warm, nutrient-starved areas (195:28:1) near the equator than in cold, nutrient-rich polar zones (78:13:1).
First, a warmer Arctic reduces the temperature gradient between the temperate and polar zones. That slows the wind speeds in the zone between the two and increases the "wave amplitude" of the jet stream.
In the end, we have found the granular structure more notable and easy to distinguish in the middle of the disc than near the limb, and in the zones near the sun's equator, more than in the polar zones. The first [of these features] is without doubt an effect of the sun's refraction: in fact, the transparent atmosphere which encircles the sun must, because of its thickness and greater agitation, produce a greater confusion near the limb.
The lack of meteorological ground stations in polar zones impedes forecasting in more temperate latitudes, because their weather is influenced by events in the Arctic and Antarctic.
In much the way magnetospheric electrons hitting Earth's polar zones cause auroras, these ions were thought to generate X-rays by colliding with the Jovian atmosphere.
In the past, scientists lacked a clear view of how climate change might affect tropical regions - in part, says Rosenzweig, because projections suggest that temperatures would increase less dramatically in tropical areas than in mid-latitude and polar zones. Prior to the new study, researchers could argue that enhanced crop growth from higher carbon dioxide levels would balance the relatively small temperature rise expected in the tropics, she says.