polarizability


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polarizability

(ˌpəʊləˌraɪzəˈbɪlɪtɪ) or

polarisability

n
(General Physics) physics chem the tendency of an atom's electron cloud to be distorted from its normal shape by an external electric field
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References in periodicals archive ?
The change at the polymers dielectric specifications are a measure for electronic, ionic and molecular polarizability. These features are being associated with the physical and chemical structure of the polymers.
His results serve as the logical foundation of several recent developments in the theory of p-adic automorphic forms and of Lan's own work with Harris, Taylor, and Thorne on the construction of Galois representations without any polarizability conditions, which is a major breakthrough in the Langlands program.
Critical electric fields, for which the slopes of curves in Figure 11 are changed abruptly, provide a drastic change of the charge distribution inside the QR and the polarizability of the structure.
Lue, "The electric double layer at high surface potentials: the influence of excess ion polarizability," EPL, vol.
In these two samples, high conduction resulting from multiple electron hopping events completely overwhelmed the polarizability attained from the dipolar chain motion.
As in the previous study, the tip is modeled as a spherical particle, the polarizability of which in Rayleigh approximation is given by a standard expression [9]:
Also, reactivity and polarizability were generally enhanced in complexes with the priority of Ag(I)-[HL.sup.4] complex in agreement with the previously displayed.
More importantly, the open-framework chalcogenides with characteristics of three dimensional (3D) ion migration channels, high porosity, and high anionic framework polarizability have long been recognized as potential fast-ion conductors, which can be used as electrodes or electrolytes in secondary batteries [19].
Molecular vibrations are defined as infrared (IR) active when the dipolar momentum of the molecule changes as the molecule vibrates, whereas vibrations are considered Raman active when the polarizability of the molecule changes as the molecule vibrates [1-3].