poleward


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.

poleward

(ˈpəʊlwəd)
adj
aimed at or toward a pole
adv
in a poleward manner
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The polar cell is centered between the poles at about 50 degrees latitude, with air sinking at the poles, flowing toward the equator, rising in the temperate latitudes, and returning poleward. The Ferrel cell is centered between 50 and 25 degrees latitude.
Along the eastern Pacific of North America, warm-temperate and subtropical species move poleward during short-term warm water anomalies, such as an El Nieo Southern Oscillation (ENSO) event (Lonhart and Tupen 2001; Lonhart 2009).
The data showed that in what are called "neutral upwelling events," multiple passes of auroral arcs moving poleward introduced energy that created the upwelling air that interferes with satellites.
The poleward expansion of suitable climates means that places we currently do not associate with tropical diseases will become the sentinels for surveillance for novel outbreaks.
The [M.sup.3] spectra only signal the presence of water in craters poleward of latitude 70[degrees], and 90% of the positive detections occur within 10[degrees] of each pole.
The ocean circulation system pumps warm tropical waters poleward, ventilating equatorial regions and tempering northern ones.
The likelihood of first order effects--extreme heat, drought, flooding, more severe storms, increased food insecurity, and the poleward spread of tropical diseases--is well known.
The dry, semi-arid regions are expanding into higher latitudes, and temperate, rainy regions are migrating poleward.
As climate change continues, species will be forced to migrate poleward to seek cooler, better oxygenated waters or face extinction.