poliomyelitis


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Related to poliomyelitis: poliomyelitis virus

po·li·o·my·e·li·tis

 (pō′lē-ō-mī′ə-lī′tĭs)
n.
A highly infectious viral disease that chiefly affects children and, in its acute forms, causes inflammation of motor neurons of the spinal cord and brainstem, leading to paralysis, muscular atrophy, and often deformity. Through vaccination, the disease is preventable. Also called infantile paralysis, polio.

[Greek polios, gray (since it affects the gray matter); see pel- in Indo-European roots + myelitis.]

po′li·o·my′e·lit′ic (-lĭt′ĭk) adj.

poliomyelitis

(ˌpəʊlɪəʊˌmaɪəˈlaɪtɪs)
n
(Pathology) an acute infectious viral disease, esp affecting children. In its paralytic form (acute anterior poliomyelitis) the brain and spinal cord are involved, causing weakness, paralysis, and wasting of muscle. Often shortened to: polio Also called: infantile paralysis
[C19: New Latin, from Greek polios grey + muelos marrow]

po•li•o•my•e•li•tis

(ˌpoʊ li oʊˌmaɪ əˈlaɪ tɪs)

n.
an acute infectious disease of motor nerves of the spinal cord and brain stem, caused by a poliovirus and sometimes resulting in muscular atrophy and skeletal deformity: formerly epidemic in children and young adults, now controlled by vaccination.
[1875–80; < Greek polió(s) gray (referring to the gray matter of the spinal cord) + myelitis]

poliomyelitis

(also known as polio) A virus infection of groups of muscles, with severe symptoms. Vaccine is available against this.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.poliomyelitis - an acute viral disease marked by inflammation of nerve cells of the brain stem and spinal cordpoliomyelitis - an acute viral disease marked by inflammation of nerve cells of the brain stem and spinal cord
infectious disease - a disease transmitted only by a specific kind of contact
Translations
dětská obrna
detská obrna

poliomyelitis

[ˈpəʊlɪəʊmaɪəˈlaɪtɪs] Npoliomielitis f

poliomyelitis

n (form)Poliomyelitis f (spec), → Kinderlähmung f

poliomyelitis

[ˈpəʊlɪəʊˌmaɪəˈlaɪtɪs] npoliomielite f

poliomyelitis, polio

(fam) n poliomielitis f, polio f (fam)
References in periodicals archive ?
Contract awarded for 100 diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (acellular, multicompuesta) and poliomyelitis (inactivated), adsorvida, suspension for injection 1 dose prefilled 0.
Poliomyelitis increased during the war in Chechnya (152 cases there in 1995) probably because of unavailability of vaccine in Chechnya during the conflict.
In 1988, the World Health Assembly resolved to eradicate poliomyelitis globally by 2000 [7].
Major organization : FEDERAL STATE UNITARY ENTERPRISE "MANUFACTURING ENTERPRISE BACTERIAL AND VIRAL PREPARATIONS INSTITUTE OF POLIOMYELITIS AND VIRAL ENCEPHALITIS MI.
On the basis of recommendations from the Technical Consultative Group on Poliomyelitis Eradication [5], India conducted four rounds of National Immunization Days (NIDs) [+] from October 1999 to January 2000 and two rounds of Subnational Immunization Days (SNIDs) [ss] during February-March 2000 in eight high-risk northern states.
The 57th Campaign for Oral Poliomyelitis Vaccination began on Monday , February 26 and will be extended to March 3.
These include Hepatitis B (jaundice), tuberculosis and poliomyelitis pertussis, tetanus, diphtheria, poliomyelitis, and Hepatitis B, poliomyelitis.
Since 2011, His Highness Sheikh Mohamed Bin Zayed has donated US$167 million to support global efforts to eradicate poliomyelitis, focusing particularly on Pakistan and Afghanistan.
Ahmed al-Hardan has emphasized the Sudan's pioneering role in the eradication of poliomyelitis compared to the countries of the Eastern Mediterranean Region, praising the experience of Sudan in the implementation of the policy of detecting acute paralysis.
The Pamir Kyrgyz in Kulanak village of Naryn region have been vaccinated against poliomyelitis, rubella and diphtheria, Turmush reported.
Infectious causes include poliomyelitis and non-polio enterovirus both resulting in disabling disease.
According to health experts, flies contaminate the food and are strongly suspected of transmitting at least 65 diseases to humans, including typhoid fever, dysentery, cholera, poliomyelitis, yaws, anthrax, tularemia, leprosy and tuberculosis.