polka

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Related to polkas: Polka music

pol·ka

 (pōl′kə, pō′kə)
n.
1. A lively dance in duple meter, originating in Bohemia and performed by couples.
2. The music for this dance.
v.intr. pol·kaed, pol·ka·ing, pol·kas
To dance the polka.

[Czech, probably from Polish, from Polka, Polish woman, feminine of Polak, Pole; see pelə- in Indo-European roots.]

polka

(ˈpɒlkə)
n, pl -kas
1. (Dancing) a 19th-century Bohemian dance with three steps and a hop, in fast duple time
2. (Music, other) a piece of music composed for or in the rhythm of this dance
vb, -kas, -kaing or -kaed
(Dancing) (intr) to dance a polka
[C19: via French from Czech pulka half-step, from pul half]

pol•ka

(ˈpoʊl kə, ˈpoʊ kə)

n., pl. -kas.
1. a lively couple dance of Bohemian origin, with music in duple meter.
2. a piece of music for such a dance.
v.i.
3. to dance the polka.
[1835–45; < Czech: literally, Polish woman or girl; compare Polish polka Polish woman]

polka


Past participle: polkaed
Gerund: polkaing

Imperative
polka
polka
Present
I polka
you polka
he/she/it polkas
we polka
you polka
they polka
Preterite
I polkaed
you polkaed
he/she/it polkaed
we polkaed
you polkaed
they polkaed
Present Continuous
I am polkaing
you are polkaing
he/she/it is polkaing
we are polkaing
you are polkaing
they are polkaing
Present Perfect
I have polkaed
you have polkaed
he/she/it has polkaed
we have polkaed
you have polkaed
they have polkaed
Past Continuous
I was polkaing
you were polkaing
he/she/it was polkaing
we were polkaing
you were polkaing
they were polkaing
Past Perfect
I had polkaed
you had polkaed
he/she/it had polkaed
we had polkaed
you had polkaed
they had polkaed
Future
I will polka
you will polka
he/she/it will polka
we will polka
you will polka
they will polka
Future Perfect
I will have polkaed
you will have polkaed
he/she/it will have polkaed
we will have polkaed
you will have polkaed
they will have polkaed
Future Continuous
I will be polkaing
you will be polkaing
he/she/it will be polkaing
we will be polkaing
you will be polkaing
they will be polkaing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been polkaing
you have been polkaing
he/she/it has been polkaing
we have been polkaing
you have been polkaing
they have been polkaing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been polkaing
you will have been polkaing
he/she/it will have been polkaing
we will have been polkaing
you will have been polkaing
they will have been polkaing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been polkaing
you had been polkaing
he/she/it had been polkaing
we had been polkaing
you had been polkaing
they had been polkaing
Conditional
I would polka
you would polka
he/she/it would polka
we would polka
you would polka
they would polka
Past Conditional
I would have polkaed
you would have polkaed
he/she/it would have polkaed
we would have polkaed
you would have polkaed
they would have polkaed

polka

A vigorous nineteenth-century Bohemian dance, that became refined in the ballrooms of Europe and the US, but faded in the twentieth century.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.polka - music performed for dancing the polkapolka - music performed for dancing the polka
dance music - music to dance to
2.polka - a Bohemian dance with 3 steps and a hop in fast time
folk dance, folk dancing - a style of dancing that originated among ordinary people (not in the royal courts)
Verb1.polka - dance a polka
trip the light fantastic, trip the light fantastic toe, dance - move in a pattern; usually to musical accompaniment; do or perform a dance; "My husband and I like to dance at home to the radio"
Translations
بولكا: إسم نَغمة او رَقْصَه
polka
polka
polka
polki
polka
polka
polka
polka dansı/müziği

polka

[ˈpɒlkə]
A. N (polkas (pl)) (= dance) → polca f
B. CPD polka dot Ndibujo m de puntos

polka

[ˈpɒlkə] npolka fpolka-dot [ˈpɒlkədɒt] adj
a polka-dot blouse → un chemisier à pois

polka

nPolka f

polka

[ˈpɒlkə] n (dance) → polca

polka

(ˈpolkə) , ((American) ˈpoulkə) noun
(a piece of music for) a type of quick, lively dance.
References in classic literature ?
The Swineherd--that is to say, the Prince (though they did not know he was anything but a true Swineherd)--let no day pass without making something, and one day he made a rattle which, when it was turned round, played all the waltzes, galops, and polkas which had ever been known since the world began.
he said, listening to the familiar sounds of polkas and waltzes floating across to him.
The hall was empty, and they had a grand polka, for Laurie danced well, and taught her the German step, which delighted Jo, being full of swing and spring.
Outside, the piano was being thumped to the tune of a popular polka.
She would have been more so if she had seen her reprehensible brother-in-law dancing a triumphal polka down the hall with Rose in honour of having silenced the enemy's battery for once.
I am going to teach you to jump and bow, to dance a waltz and a polka, and even to stand on your head.
The horthe danthed the polka till he wath dead beat (he would have walthed if he hadn't been in harneth), and then I gave him the word and he went to thleep comfortable.
Pepper stopped and began a discourse upon round dances, country dances, morris dances, and quadrilles, all of which are entirely superior to the bastard waltz and spurious polka which have ousted them most unjustly in contemporary popularity--when the waiters gently pushed him on to his table in the corner.
The average irresponsible young man who has hung about North Street on Saturday nights, walked through the meadows and round by the mill and back home past the creek on Sunday afternoons, taken his seat in the brake for the annual outing, shuffled his way through the polka at the tradesmen's ball, and generally seized all legitimate opportunities for sporting with Amaryllis in the shade, has a hundred advantages which your successful careerer lacks.
Teamed with an oversized tote and cute heels, this Scot knows how to perfect her polkas.
The shows promise to bring concert-goers elegant waltzes and playful polkas, accompanied by good old-fashioned operetta romance from internationally renowned tenor James Edwards.
The band played some old favorite polkas: "Apples, Peaches, Pumpkin Pie"; "In Heaven There is No Beer" and the "Julianna Polka," and toes were tapping.