pollen


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pol·len

 (pŏl′ən)
n.
The fine powderlike material whose individual grains contain the male reproductive cells of seed plants. Pollen is produced in the anther in angiosperms and in the male cone in gymnosperms.

[Latin, fine flour.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

pollen

(ˈpɒlən)
n
(Botany) a fine powdery substance produced by the anthers of seed-bearing plants, consisting of numerous fine grains containing the male gametes
[C16: from Latin: powder; compare Greek palē pollen]
pollinic adj

Pollen

(ˈpɒlən)
n
(Biography) Daniel. 1813–96, New Zealand statesman, born in Ireland: prime minister of New Zealand (1876)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pol•len

(ˈpɒl ən)

n.
1. the fertilizing element of flowering plants, consisting of fine, powdery, yellowish grains or spores.
v.t.
2. to pollinate.
[1515–25; < New Latin; Latin: fine flour, mill dust]
pol•lin•ic (pəˈlɪn ɪk) pol•lin′i•cal, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

pol·len

(pŏl′ən)
Powdery grains that contain the male reproductive cells of most plants. In flowering plants, pollen is produced by the anthers of stamens.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

pollen

Spores produced by plants, containing male gametes.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pollen - the fine spores that contain male gametes and that are borne by an anther in a flowering plantpollen - the fine spores that contain male gametes and that are borne by an anther in a flowering plant
spore - a small usually single-celled asexual reproductive body produced by many nonflowering plants and fungi and some bacteria and protozoans and that are capable of developing into a new individual without sexual fusion; "a sexual spore is formed after the fusion of gametes"
pollinium - a coherent mass of pollen grains (as in orchids)
ragweed pollen - pollen of the ragweed plant is a common allergen
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
لُقاحلِقَاح
pyl
pollenblomsterstøv
siitepöly
peludpolen
pollenvirágpor
frjóduft
花粉
꽃가루
apdulkinimasapdulkintižiedadulkės
putekšņiziedputekšņi
stuifmeelpollen
peľ
cvetni prah
pollen
ละอองเกสรดอกไม้
phấn hoa

pollen

[ˈpɒlən]
A. Npolen m
B. CPD pollen allergy Nalergia f polínica
pollen count Nrecuento m polínico
pollen grain Ngrano m de polen
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

pollen

[ˈpɒlən] npollen mpollen count ntaux m de pollen
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

pollen

nBlütenstaub m, → Pollen m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

pollen

[ˈpɒlən] npolline m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

pollen

(ˈpolən) noun
the powder inside a flower which fertilizes other flowers. Bees carry pollen from flower to flower.
pollinate (ˈpoləneit) verb
to make (a plant) fertile by carrying pollen to it from another flower. Insects pollinate the flowers.
ˌpolliˈnation noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

pollen

لِقَاح pyl pollen Pollen γύρη polen siitepöly pollen pelud polline 花粉 꽃가루 stuifmeel pollen pyłek kwiatowy pólen пыльца pollen ละอองเกสรดอกไม้ çiçek tozu phấn hoa 花粉
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

pol·len

n. polen;
___ countconteo de ___.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

pollen

n polen m
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
A beekeeper, seeing the bee collect pollen from flowers and carry it to the hive, says that it exists to gather honey.
Man and horse were littered with leaves and dusted with yellow pollen, for the open was ventured no more than was compulsory.
He licked the pollen and dust from his dry lips, stiffened himself, mind and body, and rode out into the blazing sunshine.
"It was always quiet there in my day," and she topped off with two little pats of pollen for the babies.
The young bee held it out in silence--unmistakably a drone leg incapable of packing pollen.
In the case of the misseltoe, which draws its nourishment from certain trees, which has seeds that must be transported by certain birds, and which has flowers with separate sexes absolutely requiring the agency of certain insects to bring pollen from one flower to the other, it is equally preposterous to account for the structure of this parasite, with its relations to several distinct organic beings, by the effects of external conditions, or of habit, or of the volition of the plant itself.
The dew, not visible till the sun was up, wetted Levin's legs and his blouse above his belt in the high growing, fragrant hemp patch, from which the pollen had already fallen out.
Through this floating, fusty DEBRIS of peat and hay, mixed with the perspirations and warmth of the dancers, and forming together a sort of vegeto-human pollen, the muted fiddles feebly pushed their notes, in marked contrast to the spirit with which the measure was trodden out.
And I will throw in Robert Brown's new thing--`Microscopic Observations on the Pollen of Plants'--if you don't happen to have it already."
I will spare you the familiar examples of the sensitive mimosa, the several insectivorous flowers and those whose stamens bend down and shake their pollen upon the entering bee in order that he may fertilize their distant mates.
The sulphur-like pollen of the pitch pine soon covered the pond and the stones and rotten wood along the shore, so that you could have collected a barrelful.
Hay fever sufferers are being warned by an expert to brace themselves for symptoms with drier weather set to trigger a peak in pollen levels.