polls


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poll

 (pōl)
n.
1. The casting and registering of votes in an election.
2. The number of votes cast or recorded.
3. polls
a. The places where votes are cast and registered during an election, considered as a group: The polls close in this state at 8:00.
b. A place where votes are cast and registered: I went to the polls before work to cast a vote.
4. A survey of the public or of a sample of public opinion to acquire information.
5. The head, especially the top of the head where hair grows.
6. The blunt or broad end of a tool such as a hammer or axe.
v. polled, poll·ing, polls
v.tr.
1. To receive (a given number of votes).
2. To receive or record the votes of: polling a jury.
3. To cast (a vote or ballot).
4. To question in a survey; canvass.
5. To cut off or trim (hair, horns, or wool, for example); clip.
6. To trim or cut off the hair, wool, branches, or horns of: polled the sheep; polled the trees.
v.intr.
To vote at the polls in an election.

[Middle English pol, head, from Middle Low German or Middle Dutch.]

poll′er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.polls - the place where people votepolls - the place where people vote    
position, place - the particular portion of space occupied by something; "he put the lamp back in its place"
References in classic literature ?
But, she was here interrupted by her father's voice exclaiming angrily, 'Now, Poll Parrot
Blest if I believe such a Poll Parrot as you was ever learned to speak
As to poll taxes, I, without scruple, confess my disapprobation of them; and though they have prevailed from an early period in those States[1] which have uniformly been the most tenacious of their rights, I should lament to see them introduced into practice under the national government.
They took one man up to the booth, in a truck, fast asleep, by way of experiment, but it was no go--they wouldn't poll him; so they brought him back, and put him to bed again.
My boy, Liberty does not come from colors, they only show party, and all the liberty you can get out of them is, liberty to get drunk at other people's expense, liberty to ride to the poll in a dirty old cab, liberty to abuse any one that does not wear your color, and to shout yourself hoarse at what you only half-understand -- that's your liberty
Cover thy poll, Gaul, cover thy poll,” cried the driver, who was Mr.
I was so dead asleep at first, being fatigued with rowing, or part of the day, and with walking the latter part, that I did not wake thoroughly; but dozing thought I dreamed that somebody spoke to me; but as the voice continued to repeat, "Robin Crusoe, Robin Crusoe," at last I began to wake more perfectly, and was at first dreadfully frightened, and started up in the utmost consternation; but no sooner were my eyes open, but I saw my Poll sitting on the top of the hedge; and immediately knew that it was he that spoke to me; for just in such bemoaning language I had used to talk to him and teach him; and he had learned it so perfectly that he would sit upon my finger, and lay his bill close to my face and cry, "Poor Robin Crusoe
Trelawney (that, you will remember, was the squire's name) had got up from his seat and was striding about the room, and the doctor, as if to hear the better, had taken off his powdered wig and sat there looking very strange indeed with his own close-cropped black poll.
There was besides in the inn, as servant, an Asturian lass with a broad face, flat poll, and snub nose, blind of one eye and not very sound in the other.
She had a poll of very dirty and untidy red hair; her eyes were set close together; she had the jowl of the traditional prize-fighter.
Sam was a great talker, and it was said Goldsmith "wrote like an angel and spoke like poor Poll.
I couldn't help laughing, which made Poll swear, and Aunt woke up and scolded us both.