pollster


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Related to pollster: Rasmussen

poll·ster

 (pōl′stər)
n.
One that takes public-opinion surveys.
Word History: The suffix -ster is used to make nouns referring to persons and can be found in a variety of words that are part of the current vocabulary of English, such as hipster, huckster, jokester, pollster, and youngster. Some of these nouns can refer to either males or females, while others typically denote males. Originally in Old English, however, the suffix (then spelled -estre) was used to form feminine agent nouns. Hoppestre, for example, meant "female dancer" and was the feminine corresponding to the masculine hoppere, "dancer" (that is, a " hopper," so to speak). The suffix -estre was occasionally applied to men in Old English, but mostly to translate Latin masculine nouns denoting occupations that were usually held by women in Anglo-Saxon society. An example is bæcester, "baker," glossing Latin pistor; it survives as the Modern English name Baxter. In Middle English its use as a masculine suffix became more common in northern England, while in the south it remained limited to feminines. In time the masculine usage became dominant throughout the country, and old feminines in -ster were refashioned by adding the newer feminine suffix -ess (borrowed from French) to them, such as seamstress remade from seamster. In Modern English, the only noun ending in -ster with a feminine referent is spinster, which originally meant "a woman who spins thread."

pollster

(ˈpəʊlstə)
n
a person who conducts opinion polls

poll•ster

(ˈpoʊl stər)

n.
one who conducts public-opinion polls.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pollster - someone who conducts surveys of public opinion; "a pollster conducts public opinion polls"; "a headcounter counts heads"
asker, enquirer, inquirer, querier, questioner - someone who asks a question
Translations
anketar

pollster

[ˈpəʊlstəʳ] Nencuestador(a) m/f

pollster

[ˈpəʊlstər] nsondeur m, enquêteur/euse m/fpoll taker n (US)sondeur mpoll tax n (British) (formerly)impôts mpl locaux

pollster

nMeinungsforscher(in) m(f)

pollster

[ˈpəʊlstəʳ] nchi esegue sondaggi d'opinione
References in periodicals archive ?
First, those who oppose Barack Obama because of his race can certainly find other ways to dress that up for a pollster. There are, after all, ample reasons to support John McCain, whether because of his experience -- or Obama's lack thereof -- or his positions on issues from Iraq to taxes.
One pollster reckons that 20 per cent of voters are still claiming they're undecided which way to go.
The polled sometimes have second thoughts after the pollster hangs up.
The poll of 800 likely voters was conducted by Republican pollster Bill McInturff of Public Opinion Strategies and Democratic pollster Celinda Lake of Lake Research Partners.
Six years ago, evangelical pollster George Barna issued a study noting the high divorce rate among his coreligionists.
Sabato was a "biased" source, Wadhams sniffed to reporters from the Newport News, Va.-based Daily Press, and The Wall Street Journal poll carried out by establishment pollster John Zogby was "a joke." Moreover, said Wadhams, Zogby had "long ago been discredited."
'We are the Olympic champions and everyone wants to beat us now and that will only lift us higher and higher,' said Campbell Paralympic dressage rider Lee Pearson received an OBE for services to equestrianism and disabled sport Veteran pollster Sir Robert Worcester, who was knighted, said two years ago he would have given odds of 10,000 to 1 that he would not have been at the Palace.
Goeas and his partners Dave Sackett and Brian Tringali currently serve as pollster to 16 Republican Governors and U.S.
The nation's voters call education the top federal budgetary priority and 63 percent say the United States should be spending more on schools, according to a recent poll commissioned by the National Education Association and jointly conducted by Republican pollster The Tarrance Group and Democratic pollster Greenberg Quinlan Research.
This tendency was recently noted by prominent pollster John Zogby, who informed a Jan.
Overall, 64% of respondents to the survey conducted by Democratic pollster Rob Schroth and Republican pollster Kellyanne Conway said they support allowing U.S.
Our Constitution makes no mention of pollster democracy, and for good reason.