polonism

polonism

(ˈpɒləˌnɪzəm)
n
a Polish characteristic or sense of identity
References in periodicals archive ?
Thirty chapters cover exorcism; fear; contagion; war on terror; government by alarm; order; peace; a hundred days; intelligence; British bogies; moral order; mysticism; Teutomania; suicide terrorists; corrosion; the empire of evil; synagogues of Satan; Comit<AEe> Directeur; the Duke of Texas; the Apostolate; mutiny; cleansing; counter-revolution; Jupiter Tonans; scandals; sewers; the China of Europe; a mistake; Polonism; Satan on the loose.
The primary argument is that, since 'Polonism had resisted the utmost efforts of Germanism and Slavonism for more than a hundred years,' Poland has a future as 'an outpost of Western civilisation' between these powers.
Bendin explicitly and at length argues against this conception, countering that both before and after the religion tolerance ukaz of 17 April 1905 Russian measures toward Catholicism in the Northwest provinces were characterized by a reasonable desire to maintain public order, prevent ethno-religious strife, and protect Orthodox believers from aggressive Polonism. (2) This argument, based on an enormous amount of archival research, cannot be dismissed.
Gozenpud lists a number of coincidences between the Censor's Report and Bulgarin's historical novel Dimitry the Pretender, and cites even more examples in Bulgarin's oeuvre of the polonism pripominat' instead of napominat'.
This edition restores several previously unpublished paragraphs of "A Note on the Polish Problem," a memorandum Conrad wrote in 1916 for circulation in the Foreign Office appealing for a post-war Anglo-French protectorate (with Russian concurrence) to ensure the revival of "Polonism" after more than 120 years of submission to German and Russian hegemony.
Conrad's Polonism, as well has his relationship to exile and marginality, is specific to szlachcic from the Eastern borderland.
As GoGwilt argues, Conrad opposes the idea of the West to the "Slavonism" of Russia and also links Poland and the West both by arguing that Poland is a country with Western culture and values, and by opposing "Polonism" (which is Western) to Russia's "Slavonism" which is not (39).
(22) Throughout that volume, according to Hamburg, "the authors' antipathy toward Polonism ...
Komzolova notes that Potapov was more concerned with socialism than with Polonism and preferred to return to the Polish nobility as a base of support for the regime against the danger of socialist upheaval (250).
The government apparently conceived of this policy as a defense of Russian Orthodoxy against Catholicism, rather than as a defense of the "Russian" peasantry against Polonism. It was precisely during this period, however, that the historians Nikolai Gerasimovich Ustrialov and Mikhail Petrovich Pogodin began to write about the ethnic Russian identity of peasants in the Western region--an idea that after 1863 became an axiom of the government's Russification policies.
Hence, the encyclopaedia provides further information on such concepts and practices as Polonisms, population migration, Russification, and Russophilism, all of which aimed at cultural assimilation of Ukrainians.
It comes therefore as no surprise that some of his contemporary fellow writers and critics described his behavior as "Oriental," a way of marking him out as not totally "one of us." Additionally, his written idiom, though of the highest quality, teems with Polonisms that alienate, to some extent, his British readers and constantly remind us of his Polish background.