polyandry


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Related to polyandry: fraternal polyandry

pol·y·an·dry

 (pŏl′ē-ăn′drē)
n.
1. The condition or practice of having more than one husband at one time.
2. Zoology A mating pattern in which a female mates with more than one male in a single breeding season.
3. Botany The condition of having numerous stamens.

pol′y·an′drous (-ăn′drəs) adj.

polyandry

(ˈpɒlɪˌændrɪ)
n
1. (Anthropology & Ethnology) the practice or condition of being married to more than one husband at the same time. Compare polygamy
2. (Zoology) the practice in animals of a female mating with more than one male during one breeding season
3. (Botany) the condition in flowers of having a large indefinite number of stamens
[C18: from Greek poluandria, from poly- + -andria from anēr man]
ˌpolyˈandrous adj

pol•y•an•dry

(ˈpɒl iˌæn dri, ˌpɒl iˈæn-)

n.
1. the practice or condition of having more than one husband at one time.
2. (among female animals) the habit or system of having two or more mates, either simultaneously or successively.
3. Bot. the state of being polyandrous.
[1770–80; < Greek polyandría. See poly-, -andry]

polyandry

the practice of having two or more husbands at a time. — polyandrous, adj.
See also: Marriage
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.polyandry - having more than one husband at a time
polygamy - having more than one spouse at a time
Translations
mnohomužství
poluandri%a
mnogomuštvopoliandrijavišemuštvo
************
poliandria
mnogomuštvovišemuštvo

polyandry

[ˈpɒlɪændrɪ] Npoliandria f

polyandry

nVielmännerei f, → Polyandrie f (form)

polyandry

[ˈpɒlɪændrɪ] npoliandria
References in classic literature ?
Getting them together, she said that she really could not choose between them because she loved them both equally well; and that, unfortunately, since polyandry was not permitted in the United States she would be compelled to forego the honor and happiness of marrying either of them.
"Polyandry and Population Growth in a Historical Tibetan Society." The History of the Family 8, no.
There are also apprehensions that increasing paucity of women may force the revival of polyandry in certain segments of Indian society which are more permissive sections.
"Prairie dogs are excellent models for a study of polyandry because they are easy to livetrap, mark, and observe.
A visible consequence of this is the marked increase in the number of live- in relationships in small towns like Shimla, Chamba and Kullu -- a trend elders still look down upon despite the state's own culture of polygamy and polyandry. A major factor that drives people of the state to live- ins is parents' objection to inter- caste/ community marriages, and a growing reluctance to sacrifice love at the altar of entrenched bias.
Although eastern bluebirds are typically socially monogamous passerines (Verner and Willson, 1969; Gowaty, 1983; Gowaty and Plissner, 1998), rare instances of polygyny (Wetherbee, 1933b) and polyandry (Laskey, 1947; Verner and Willson, 1969) have been documented.
It was then Community policing officer Adhalah Abdulrahman suggested that Mendwa and Kimani marry the woman which would be recognised under Polyandry - a woman with multiple husbands.
We examine the links between polyandry, multiple paternity and offspring phenotypic diversity in the color polymorphic pygmy grasshopper Tetrix subulata.
This accounts for Locke's openness to divorce, polygyny, and polyandry. Yenor correctly emphasizes that Locke's family system would work well within a culture informed by Christian principles, yet also "unravels without these props." Rousseau was "more concerned than Locke that the family approximate nature" and emphasized the natural aspects of maternity, breastfeeding, and the sexual division of labor.
However, other studies have revealed cases of polygyny or polyandry in this genus (AKRE et al., 1994; FRASER et al., 2000; GADAU et al., 1996; GERTSCH et al., 1995).
Besson (1998:138) also points out that 'serial polyandry' and 'serial polygyny' (sequential husbands and wives) are common practices." However, my research (which does not use the Eurocentric concept of "common-law marriage" for Caribbean consensual cohabitation) distinguishes bilateral kinship from cognatic descent.
The traditional Tibetan society being quite open in nature was a witness to all the three forms of marriage such as monogamy, polygamy and polyandry. But, today the polygamy and polyandry as major forms of traditional marriage have yielded to modern form of marriage i.e., monogamy which is a common form of marriage nowadays among the modern Tibetan community particularly those in exile.