polycentrism


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pol·y·cen·tric

 (pŏl′ē-sĕn′trĭk)
adj.
1. Having many centers, especially of authority or control.
2. Having several central parts, as a chromosome with multiple centromeres.
n.
A polycentric chromosome.

pol′y·cen′trism n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

polycentrism

(ˌpɒlɪˈsɛntrɪzəm)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (formerly) the fact, principle, or advocacy of the existence of more than one guiding or predominant ideological or political centre in a political system, alliance, etc, in the Communist world
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pol•y•cen•trism

(ˌpɒl iˈsɛn trɪz əm)

n.
the existence or advocacy of several independent centers of leadership, power, or ideology within a single political system, esp. in Communism.
[1955–60]
pol`y•cen′tric, adj.
pol`y•cen′trist, n., adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

polycentrism

the existence of a number of basic guiding principles in the political system of a Communist government. — polycentrist, n., adj.
See also: Communism
the existence of a number of basic guiding principles in the political system of a Communist government.
See also: Politics
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations
polycentrisme
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References in periodicals archive ?
Social Media: Polycentrism between the Commons and Coproduction
Therefore some 'urgency of now' emerges to update the transnational frame on the new horizon of global-local relations reflected or refracted both 'in and outside' Hollywood, without recourse to reductive 'apolitical polycentrism.' I propose a global frame of world cinema in this context.
The editors of The Flies have found an innovative solution to this dilemma in their sequencing of the anthology, something akin to a temporal polycentrism, of this later.
In fact, the first application of polycentrism as a development policy goes back to the 1960s when the French "metropoles d'equilibre" reinforced the development of a number of cities at the upper part of the urban hierarchy (Moseley 1974), with ultimate goal to counterweigh the dominant Paris.
Polycentrism in global health governance scholarship: Comment on "Four challenges that global health networks face." Int J Health Policy Manag.
198) is the concept of polycentrism, embedded in a multilevel governance system.
Historically, such trends had emerged in India, in the past, causing serious polycentrism, that would now be accelerating regional drift by more than a dozen on-going insurgencies.
[52.] Skelcher, C., 'Jurisdictional Integrity, Polycentrism, and the Design of Democratic Governance', 2005, Governance, vol.
"Urban Structure and Polycentrism: Towards a Redefinition of the Sub-Centre Concept." Urban Studies 46 (13) : 2841-68.
"The Link between Polycentrism and Adaptive Capacity in River Basin Governance Systems: Insights from the River Rhine and the Zhujiang (Pearl River) Basin," Annals of the Association of American Geographers 103(2): 319-329.
Step (2): Ethnocentrism, its occurrence leads to the locals perceiving their cultures as superior to those of the foreigners; and step (3), which takes the longer than the others to be reached--and which, in fact, may never be reached in some societies--is 'polycentrism', where locals evaluate the foreigner as having different standards because they are different.