polychromy


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pol·y·chro·my

 (pŏl′ē-krō′mē)
n.
The use of many colors in decoration, especially in architecture and sculpture.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

polychromy

(ˈpɒlɪˌkrəʊmɪ)
n
(Art Terms) decoration in many colours, esp in architecture or sculpture
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pol•y•chro•my

(ˈpɒl iˌkroʊ mi)

n.
the art of employing many colors in decoration, as in painting.
[1855–60]
pol`y•chro′mous, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

polychromy

the art of using many or various colors in painting, architecture, etc. — polychromie, polychromatic, adj.polychromatist, n.
See also: Art
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

polychromy

[ˈpɒlɪˌkrəʊmɪ] npolicromia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
A few others, provided they are in largely original though apparently re-done condition, have traces of an ancient polychromy as well.
It's very rare to find works that have original polychromy; we have only one in the exhibition and a second one that we would have loved to have could not come because of its fragility.
An entire galleryis being converted into a publicConservation in Actionlab where conservators will carefully clean the wooden sculpturesall decorated with polychromy or gildingand secure areas of loose paint, lacquer, and gilding.
Colombini, "The binding media of the polychromy of Qin Shihuang's Terracotta Army," Journal of Cultural Heritage, vol.
Caption: Pendant to a rosary or chaplet, ivory with traces of polychromy, attributed to Chicart Bailly, circa 1500-1530, thought to be created in Paris
It has been a place of discovery--not just of the polychromy of the arch menorah, but also of the many paths and palimpsest that are the menorah.
Emerging colors: Roman sculptural polychromy revived.
The African features are emphasized by the surviving remains of the old polychromy. The skin is colored bluish black, the lips are red, and the dark pupils stand out clearly against the white of the eyeballs.
A history of layered architecture is then expounded, addressing polychromy, collage, transparency, and new technological means of producing layered appearance.
However, in contrast to the fuller polychromy featured in "Teatro Romano,'" on this occasion, only the woman's lips had been lightly tinted.
Polychromy was thus understood as a powerful element of creation, with the capacity to affect transformations of the recipient deity or king, including revitalization, rebirth, and divinization.
The Tinted Venus by the nineteenth-century English artist John Gibson, which likely replicates the original polychromy of the Knidia, has been described by John Boardman (2004, 52 and Fig.