polygeny


Also found in: Medical.

po·lyg·e·ny

 (pə-lĭj′ə-nē)
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

polygeny

(pəˈlɪdʒɪnɪ)
n
(Anthropology & Ethnology) another name for polygenesis
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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If we compare this conception to Clastres's chieftainship, we see that, like the chief, the church is the bearer of 'words' (the divine sign), the bestower of 'gifts' (mediating divine revelation and grace), and is uniquely entitled to 'polygeny' (the nuns, Christ's brides, but also the priests, who are bound to celibacy and are thereby set apart from mundane exchange).
The doctrine of 'polygeny' was one of the first theories of largely American origin that won the attention and respect of European scientists so much that Europeans referred to polygenesis theory as the 'American School' of anthropology.
(33.) See generally Stephen Jay Gould, American Polygeny and Craniometry Before Darwin." Blacks and Indians as Separate, Inferior Species, in THE "RACIAL" ECONOMY OF SCIENCE: TOWARD A DEMOCRATIC FUTURE 84, 111 14 (Sandra Harding ed., 1993); DOROTHY ROBERTS, FATAL INVENTION: HOW SCIENCE, POLITICS, AND BIG BUSINESS RE-CREATE RACE IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY 3543 (2011).
Gould, Stephen (1993) "American Polygeny and Craniometry Before Darwin." In the Racial Economy of Science: Toward a Democratic Future.
We could help students model how multiple genes (polygeny) contribute to continuously varying traits, which are also affected by environmental variables.