polyglot

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pol·y·glot

 (pŏl′ē-glŏt′)
adj.
Speaking, writing, written in, or composed of several languages.
n.
1. A person having a speaking, reading, or writing knowledge of several languages.
2. A book, especially a Bible, containing several versions of the same text in different languages.
3. A mixture or confusion of languages.

[French polyglotte, from Greek poluglōttos : polu-, poly- + glōtta, tongue, language.]

pol′y·glot′ism, pol′y·glot′tism n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

polyglot

(ˈpɒlɪˌɡlɒt)
adj
1. having a command of many languages
2. written in, composed of, or containing many languages
n
3. a person with a command of many languages
4. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) a book, esp a Bible, containing several versions of the same text written in various languages
5. a mixture or confusion of languages
[C17: from Greek poluglōttos literally: many-tongued, from poly- + glōtta tongue]
ˈpolyˌglotism, ˈpolyˌglottism n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pol•y•glot

(ˈpɒl iˌglɒt)

adj.
1. able to speak or write several languages; multilingual.
2. containing, composed of, or written in several languages.
n.
3. a mixture or confusion of languages.
4. a person who speaks, writes, or reads several languages.
5. (often cap.) a book, esp. a Bible, containing the same text in several languages.
[1635–45; < Medieval Latin polyglōttus < Greek polýglōttos many-tongued]
pol′y•glot`ism, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

polyglot

- Meaning "written in or knowing many languages," it is from Greek polu-, "many," and glotto, "tongue."
See also related terms for knowing.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

polyglot

1. a person who speaks several languages.
2. a mixture of languages. See also books. — polyglot, n., adj. — polyglottic, polyglottous, adj.
See also: Language
a book written in several languages. See also language. — polyglot, polyglottic, polyglottous, adj.
See also: Books
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.polyglot - a person who speaks more than one language
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
bilingual, bilingualist - a person who speaks two languages fluently
transcriber, translator - a person who translates written messages from one language to another
Adj.1.polyglot - having a command of or composed in many languages; "a polyglot traveler"; "a polyglot Bible contains versions in different languages"
multilingual - using or knowing more than one language; "a multilingual translator"; "a multilingual nation"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
polyglot
monikielinen
meertaligpolyglot

polyglot

[ˈpɒlɪglɒt]
A. ADJpolígloto
B. Npolígloto/a m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

polyglot

[ˈpɒliglɒt]
adj (= multilingual) → polyglotte
n (= person) → polyglotte m/f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

polyglot

n (= person)Polyglotte(r) mf
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

polyglot

[ˈpɒlɪˌglɒt] adj & npoliglotta (m/f)
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
"Iterability," Jacques Derrida's polyglottal portmanteau term, describes the capacity of signs and texts to be repeated in new situations and to produce new meanings.
Regardless of the range of responses to code switching, it is, as Balme states, "a theatrico-semiotic process comparable to the recoding of dances, songs, or rituals" and evidence of "the polyglottal stage" of syncretic theatre (110).
The geography is Balkan--the film was shot partly in Serbia--but the cast has the multiracial "no-place" look of colorblind casting, and the polyglottal "no-place" sound of actors using their native accents; this cuts against any interpretation of the piece as representing the actual Balkans.