polygraph

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pol·y·graph

 (pŏl′ē-grăf′)
n.
An instrument that measures the physiological responses of an individual to questions from an examiner who interprets the results as indicating the likelihood that the individual is telling or not telling the truth in giving the answers.
tr.v. pol·y·graphed, pol·y·graph·ing, pol·y·graphs
To test (a criminal suspect, for example) with a polygraph.

po·lyg′ra·pher (pə-lĭg′rə-fər), po·lyg′ra·phist (-fĭst) n.
pol′y·graph′ic adj.

polygraph

(ˈpɒlɪˌɡrɑːf; -ˌɡræf)
n
1. (Medicine) an instrument for the simultaneous electrical or mechanical recording of several involuntary physiological activities, including blood pressure, skin resistivity, pulse rate, respiration, and sweating, used esp as a would-be lie detector
2. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) a device for producing copies of written, printed, or drawn matter
[C18: from Greek polugraphos writing copiously]
polygraphic adj
ˌpolyˈgraphically adv

pol•y•graph

(ˈpɒl ɪˌgræf, -ˌgrɑf)

n.
1. an instrument for receiving and recording simultaneously tracings of variations in certain body activities.
3. a test using a lie detector.
v.t.
4. to test (a person) with a polygraph.
[1795–1805; < Greek polýgraphos writing much. See poly-, -graph]
pol`y•graph′ic (-ˈgræf ɪk) adj.

polygraph

a lie detecting device. — polygrapher, polygraphist, n. — polygraphic, adj.
See also: Lies and Lying
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.polygraph - a medical instrument that records several physiological processes simultaneously (e.g., pulse rate and blood pressure and respiration and perspiration)
lie detector - a polygraph that records bodily changes sometimes associated with lying
medical instrument - instrument used in the practice of medicine
Translations
valheenpaljastin

polygraph

[ˈpɒlɪgrɑːf] Npolígrafo m, detector m de mentiras

polygraph

[ˈpɒligrɑːf] ndétecteur m de mensonges polygraph testpolygraph test ntest m au détecteur de mensonges

polygraph

n (US: = lie detector) → Lügendetektor m

polygraph

[ˈpɒlɪˌgrɑːf] nmacchina della verità

pol·y·graph

n. polígrafo, instrumento para obtener diversas pulsaciones arteriales y venosas simultáneamente.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is estimated that we need to have approximately 300 polygraphs performed by the successful offeror during the first year of this Contract.
Mr Hubble said that the tests provide 92% to 98% accuracy and that the Ministry of Justice has been training probation officers to use polygraphs to ensure that serious sex offenders adhere to their licence conditions.
The dependent measures used in the second experiment were the likelihood that the accused was guilty (9-point likert scale), participants' verdicts (dichotomous), confidence of the verdict (9-point likert scale), and three general questions (familiarity with polygraphs, their estimation of the accuracy of polygraphs, and relative accuracy with other evidence; all 9-point likert scale).
Traditional polygraphs usually use a contact sensor to detect blood pressure, pause and muscle activities of the targets, but sometimes it doesn't work on people who have received professional training," Zhou said,"the advantage of our new polygraph is the non-contact detector, which will lower the vigilance of targets.
Fair Defence barrister Martin Steen said if probation officers are allowed to use polygraphs they should also be admissible evidence.
Kane says that compared to polygraphs, CVSA is easier to use; takes less time per exam; is less expensive; yields more positive results; is harder to defeat; has a very low error rate; is noninvasive; and works with voice recordings as well as live interactions.
A spokesman for London has confirmed that he told a group of polygraph examiners earlier this year that, in his experience as a Secret Service agent in the 1980s, he found that "completing polygraphs with Filipinos was difficult.
Snyder said polygraphs are easily manipulated and routinely disregarded by courts.
Department of Defense, Department of Homeland Security, Customs and Border Protection, and Department of Energy use polygraphs regularly to screen employees and applicants for sensitive positions, and these agencies always are looking for more effective ways to detect lies.
Before I saw the flyer I had thought of polygraphs as an American obscurity, used only in daytime talk shows in the UK.
I would say no interview technique is 100 per cent effective but polygraphs are about 85 to 89 per cent accurate and that is much better than anything else.
Accordingly, depending upon the mediator's views of the reliability of polygraphs, the impact of a favorable polygraph can be significant upon the mediator's evaluation of the case.