polynomial


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pol·y·no·mi·al

 (pŏl′ē-nō′mē-əl)
adj.
Of, relating to, or consisting of more than two names or terms.
n.
1. A taxonomic designation consisting of more than two terms.
2. Mathematics
a. An algebraic expression consisting of one or more summed terms, each term consisting of a constant multiplier and one or more variables raised to nonnegative integral powers. For example, x2 - 5x + 6 and 2p3q + y are polynomials. Also called multinomial.
b. An expression of two or more terms.

polynomial

(ˌpɒlɪˈnəʊmɪəl)
adj
of, consisting of, or referring to two or more names or terms. Also called: multinominal
n
1. (Mathematics)
a. a mathematical expression consisting of a sum of terms each of which is the product of a constant and one or more variables raised to a positive or zero integral power. For one variable, x, the general form is given by: a0xn + a1xn–1 + … + an–1x + an, where a0, a1, etc, are real numbers
b. Also called: multinomial any mathematical expression consisting of the sum of a number of terms
2. (Biology) biology a taxonomic name consisting of more than two terms, such as Parus major minor in which minor designates the subspecies

pol•y•no•mi•al

(ˌpɒl əˈnoʊ mi əl)

adj.
1. consisting of or characterized by two or more names or terms.
n.
2. an algebraic expression consisting of the sum of two or more terms.
3. a polynomial name or term.
4. a species name containing more than two terms.
[1665–75]

pol·y·no·mi·al

(pŏl′ē-nō′mē-əl)
An algebraic expression that is represented as the sum of two or more terms. The expressions x2 - 4 and 5x4 + 2x3 - x + 7 are both polynomials.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.polynomial - a mathematical function that is the sum of a number of terms
biquadratic polynomial, quartic polynomial, biquadratic - a polynomial of the fourth degree
homogeneous polynomial - a polynomial consisting of terms all of the same degree
monic polynomial - a polynomial in one variable
quadratic polynomial, quadratic - a polynomial of the second degree
series - (mathematics) the sum of a finite or infinite sequence of expressions
math, mathematics, maths - a science (or group of related sciences) dealing with the logic of quantity and shape and arrangement
function, mapping, mathematical function, single-valued function, map - (mathematics) a mathematical relation such that each element of a given set (the domain of the function) is associated with an element of another set (the range of the function)
Adj.1.polynomial - having the character of a polynomial; "a polynomial expression"
Translations
polynom
polynomi
polynômepolynomial
polinom
polinomialepolinomio
polynompolynomiell

polynomial

[ˌpɒlɪˈnəʊmɪəl]
A. ADJpolinomio
B. Npolinomio m

polynomial

adjpolynomisch
nPolynom nt

polynomial

[ˌpɒlɪˈnəʊmɪəl] npolinomio
References in periodicals archive ?
117 Polynomial Problems From the AwesomeMath Summer Program
Noting that polynomials form the cornerstone of modern mathematics and other discrete fields, Andreescu, Safaei, and Ventullo, showcase their true beauty with a carefully thought out collection of problems from mathematics competitions that they introduce with intuitive lectures on various sub-topics.
A polynomial ring K[X] in variable X over a field K is the set of polynomials: P = [[alpha].sub.0] + [a.sub.1] * X + [a.sub.2] * [X.sup.2] + ...
The degree (deg) of a polynomial represents the largest power of X for which the coefficient [a.sub.n] is not null.
These measures encompass a relatively broad selection of continuous measures [mu] on R, including all measures associated with classical orthogonal polynomial families.
The utility of sampling from univariate induced distributions has recently come into light: The authors in various papers [11, 19, 3] note that additive mixtures of induced distributions are optimal sampling distributions for constructing multivariate polynomial approximations of functions using weighted discrete least-squares from independent and identically-distributed random samples.
where A is a linear differential operator and each qv(x) is a polynomial of degree at most [n.sub.0] [member of] N; [n.sub.0] does not depend on v.
One of the interesting and fruitful subjects in geometry of polynomials is the geometrical relation between the modulus of a complex polynomial on a circle and the position of zeros of this polynomial inside or outside this circle.
With the development of q-calculus in the mid-19th century, many authors made generalizations to special functions and polynomial families based on the q-analogs (cf.
Let f be a real valued function defined and bounded on [0,1]; let [B.sub.m](f) be the polynomial on [0,1], defined by
Sarrouy [13] has proposed a numerical method based on polynomial chaos expansions to process stochastic eigenvalue problems efficiently.
The q-analogue of number x is defined as [[absolute value of x].sub.q] = ([q.sup.x] - 1)/(q- 1).As iswell known, the Euler polynomials are defined by the generating function to be