polyphonic


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pol·y·phon·ic

 (pŏl′ē-fŏn′ĭk)
adj.
1. Music Of, relating to, or characterized by polyphony.
2. Linguistics Having two or more phonetic values.

pol′y·phon′i·cal·ly adv.

polyphonic

(ˌpɒlɪˈfɒnɪk)
adj
1. (Music, other) music composed of relatively independent melodic lines or parts; contrapuntal
2. many-voiced
3. (Phonetics & Phonology) phonetics of, relating to, or denoting a polyphone
ˌpolyˈphonically adv

pol•y•phon•ic

(ˌpɒl iˈfɒn ɪk)

adj.
1. of, pertaining to, or marked by musical polyphony.
2. having more than one phonetic value, as the letter s, pronounced as voiced (z) in nose and voiceless (s) in salt.
[1775–85]
pol`y•phon′i•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.polyphonic - having two or more phonetic values; "polyphonic letters such as `a'"
linguistics - the scientific study of language
2.polyphonic - of or relating to or characterized by polyphony; "polyphonic traditions of the baroque"
music - an artistic form of auditory communication incorporating instrumental or vocal tones in a structured and continuous manner
3.polyphonic - having two or more independent but harmonically related melodic parts sounding together
music - an artistic form of auditory communication incorporating instrumental or vocal tones in a structured and continuous manner
monophonic - consisting of a single melodic line
Translations

polyphonic

[ˌpɒlɪˈfɒnɪk] ADJ (Mus) → polifónico

polyphonic

adj (Mus) → polyfon

polyphonic

[ˌpɒlɪˈfɒnɪk] adj (Mus) → polifonico/a
References in periodicals archive ?
The Polyphonic Mass in France, 1600-1780: The Evidence of the Printed Choirbooks.
LLANDAFF Cathedral will echo to the glorious sound of renaissance Venice this weekend when Cardiff Polyphonic Choir perform Claudio Monteverdi's magnificent Vespers of 1610.
The church choir from Cavite also won first prize in the historic polyphonic, 20th century polyphonic and pop and jazz categories.
The polyphonic group, under the direction of Patrick Luetolf, has an eclectic repertory varying from the religious to the secular: traditional, folk and gospel as well as contemporary creations.
They look like a Jim Jonesy, crazy Christian cult or some sort of slacker choir and in a way Polyphonic Spree share elements of both.
We chose the Russian writer because, according to Bakhtin (1999: 7), "Dostoevsky is the creator of the polyphonic novel." We propose to develop two specific objectives: (i) to present two discourse procedures: immiscibility and inter-independence to understand the polyphonic novel; (ii) discuss the results of this analysis in parallel to the study of Bakhtin (1999) to verify the relevance of the proposed procedures.
Hefele giving a brief demonstration of what she called "polyphonic overtone singing," and it quickly made the rounds on social media sites.
It says much about the Cardiff Polyphonic Choir that Sir Colin invited them to take part in that 1987 concert.
9) So each vignette involves a graph for which early polyphony has been proposed, and Button then considers other graphic and phonological evidence and, most of the time, argues against the plausibility of a polyphonic interpretation.
A striking feature of cathedral music in the Iberian Peninsula and Latin America during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries is the degree to which polyphonic repertories continued to be copied, adapted, enlarged, and employed in performance.
BACH ACH A TO T us, Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach's music sounds transitional - a mid-point between polyphonic baroque and the newer classical style.
Since most QbSH systems use pitch sequences, automatic transcription process is needed for the QbSH system based on polyphonic recordings, but automatically transcribed pitch sequences from polyphonic recordings are not reliable as the sequences from MIDI files [24,25,26,27].