polyphonist


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

polyphonist

(pəˈlɪfənɪst)
n
a musical composer of or theorist in polyphonya ventriloquist
Translations

polyphonist

n (Mus) → Polyfoniker(in) m(f), → Kontrapunktiker(in) m(f)
References in periodicals archive ?
An evolved homophone thought can be encountered in Johann Sebastian Bach, a polyphonist whose work is, in fact, a perfect symbiosis between sound combinations that regard both simultaneity and succession, the coexistence of homophony, polyphony and monody.
Mr SPRINGTHORPE respectfully announces that he has engaged PROFESSOR JAMES, the great unrivalled Ventriloquist and Polyphonist, from the Polytechnic Institution, London, with his "LITTLE TOM," "FUNNY JOE," and "OLD LADY." Also, Mr HARRY WHITFIELD, Buffo Vocalist, Mr W BAILEY, Tenor Miss FANNY ISAACS TAMBORENA VOY, the African Minstrel Mr RODERICK CONNOR, from Dublin (Dundee Courier 19 January 1859)
may open out new prospects of research not only into Ingegneri's work but also into major aspects of Italian and European music in the late sixteenth century: secondly, that the works of this illustrious polyphonist may once again return to the circuits of actual performance, on the solid foundation of a text freed from the incrustations of time.
And so King David's creation "was already vibrating with mystical, personal, and political significance" by the time Italian composer Allegri reworked a young polyphonist's musical setting of the psalm and brought it to a large audience.
But that is not so, a sensible polyphonist might concede, with conventional price and entry regulations.
These two stories, "Alyosha the Pot" and "Dream of a Ridiculous Man" demonstrate that Tolstoy, "the great moralizer," will thwart our search for a clear-cut moral if he likes, and Dostoevsky, "the great polyphonist," will lead us to an unambiguous, monophonic conclusion when he chooses.
Bach's astonishing achievement as a polyphonist is surely instructive for our age.
As for the foremost Roman polyphonist, Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina, the first example of the insertion of a basso continuo part in his compositions dates from the first decade of the 17th century.(4) There is evidence, however, that such a practice was already in use in Rome, albeit irregularly, at least as early as 1585.(5) Only the Sistine Chapel, in its role as the pope's official musical chapel, remained faithful to purely vocal performances, thus respecting its well established tradition.